The kids aren’t alright in the Howland Company’s raw, intense, disturbing Punk Rock

Tim Dowler-Coltman. Set and costume design by Nancy Anne Perrin. Lighting design by Jareth Li. Photo by Neil Silcox.

 

The Howland Company gets raw and apocalyptic with the Toronto premiere of Simon Stephens’ Punk Rock, directed by Gregory Prest assisted by Brittany Kay; opening last night in the Scotiabank Community Studio at Streetcar Crowsnest.

Set in present-day Stockport, part of the Greater Manchester, UK area, we become flies on the wall of the abandoned upper library of a tuition-paying grammar school, which a group of seniors has taken over as their hang-out. Lilly (Ruth Goodwin), the new kid trying to find her way, meets the good-natured William (Cameron Laurie), who’s more than happy to offer hilariously helpful tips to navigating the school. William also introduces Lilly (and us) to the rest of the gang: the sociable Tanya (Kristen Zaza), officially tasked by the school with showing Lilly around; the domineering Bennett (James Graham) and type-A Cissy (Hallie Seline), who are a couple; the jock Nicholas (Tim Dowler-Coltman); and the super intelligent, quiet Chadwick (Andrew Pimento).

William, who has an extremely poignant and unusual autobiography to share, is clearly crushing on Lilly, but she has eyes for someone else. Bennett is the class bully, with Chadwick as his prime whipping boy and some secret desires of his own; we see a brief moment of tenderness with his kid sister Lucy (Marleigh Merritt, who shares the role with Sophia Jin). Cissy has a photographic memory and barely studies for exams, but manages to get straight As—and is terrified of getting a lower grade. Nicholas is a gifted athlete, but doesn’t lord it over his schoolmates; he has a gentle, affable nature—and eyes for Lilly. Tanya is dealing with body image issues, expressing herself by adding colour to her look, and is just trying to fit in. The timid Chadwick is a science wiz, especially in physics—and he wears a jacket over his blazer to hide his school tie, which is different from the standard tie and sets him apart as a scholarship kid. Lilly, the daughter of a university professor who’s moved a lot, hides a self-destructive edge beneath a brave face exterior. The only adult we meet along this journey is the calm, steady Dr. Richard Harvey (Sam Kalilieh).

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Hallie Seline & James Graham. Set and costume design by Nancy Anne Perrin. Lighting design by Jareth Li. Photo by Neil Silcox.

The upper library hang-out becomes a microcosm of the school, which in turn becomes a microcosm of the world at large. All of these kids are bracing themselves, preparing in varying degrees and states of distress, for their upcoming mock exams, a litmus test for their finals later in the year. Facing a crucial transition point in their lives, these 17-year-olds are continuously bombarded with social, family, academic, socio-political and environmental expectations and pressures. And as the heat gets turned up, the space between them becomes a pressure cooker—and everyone’s going to explode.

In the program, the director’s remarks include a note on dialect from the playwright, expressing a desire for North American productions to use their own dialects; this means the actors speak with their natural accents—and it brings an immediacy and intimacy to the performance of this timely, disturbing play. This could be any school, anywhere.

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Cameron Laurie & Ruth Goodwin. Set and costume design by Nancy Anne Perrin. Lighting design by Jareth Li. Photo by Neil Silcox.

Outstanding work from the entire cast. As William, Laurie’s charming class clown persona gradually spirals from engaging and enthusiastic to deeply disappointed and troubled. And he has some lovely two-handers with Goodwin, who gives Lilly a secret dark edge of her own, masking Lilly’s own sense of fear and vulnerability.  As class power couple Bennett and Cissy, Graham and Seline appear to be polar opposites. Bennett’s sharp intellect is overlaid with a wild, sadistic streak, while Cissy is a tightly wound overachiever whose smug self-assurance belies an underlying fear of failure. And Pimento’s Chadwick is the mouse that roared, his scientific mind spitting rapid fire facts about the impending global apocalypse.

Shouts to the design team: Nancy Anne Perrin (set and costumes), Jareth Li (lighting) and Andy Trithardt (sound). The use of animal masks during scene changes, coupled with the jolting punk rock soundtrack and dramatic lighting blasts, highlight the raw, primal underbelly of these uniformed, and largely privileged, teens.

The kids aren’t alright. Ferocious urges, dark thoughts and painful secrets in the raw, intense, disturbing Punk Rock.

Punk Rock continues in the Streetcar Crowsnest Studio till April 14; advance tickets available online. In the meantime, check out the trailer:

 

 

 

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Fiercely sexy, ruthlessly funny, real & raw – Theatre Brouhaha’s Delicacy

DELICACY_Tennille-Read-Andy-Trithardt-Kelly-McCormack-and-Kaleb-Alexander-left-clockwise.-Credit-ZAIDEN-620x500I had the great pleasure of seeing Theatre Brouhaha’s production of Kat Sandler’s Delicacy for the second time during its SummerWorks run at Lower Ossington Theatre last night. I’d first seen it during at Factory Theatre Studio back in the Fall and loved its sharp-edged, quick-witted, socially apt story and characters – played out by an outstanding cast. I was very interested to see if the play had changed for this current run – and with the exception of some minor tweaks, it hadn’t. And I loved it all over again.

Since I can’t think of much more to say about it, here are my thoughts from the November post:

Deliciously sharp and brutally funny, Delicacy (which Sandler also directed) is part modern-day comedy of manners, part exploration of modern relationships. Married couple Tanya (Tennille Read) and Mark (Andy Trithardt) invite into their home Colby (Kelly McCormack) and Len (Kaleb Alexander), a couple they met during their virgin visit to swingers bar Wicked. And an eventful, erotic first time it was. Opposites attract here – Tanya and Mark are perfectly put together, mid-30s urban professionals, living in a pristine white loft designed by Tanya. Perfectly chosen pieces of “important” art. Indoor shoes. Uptight is the first impression we get. Colby and Len, on the other hand, are 30-ish, hail from the suburbs, work in non-white collar jobs and engage in a decidedly “crazy” bohemian lifestyle – and are no strangers to the swingers scene. Secrets, as well as previously unexpressed thoughts and feelings, emerge throughout the course of the evening, as both couples are forced to confront some unpleasant issues facing their marriages.

Sandler’s sharp, quick-witted dialogue is in good evidence here and this stand-out ensemble is more than up for the challenge. Read and Trithardt do a lovely job of peeling back the mask of Tanya and Mark’s perfectly coiffed, charcuterie-serving, HBO-viewing exterior to the turmoil that lies beneath, with Colby and Len as the catalysts. Read’s already sexy Tanya blossoms with Len, from impervious ice queen to hot passion-flower, while Trithardt’s controlled Mark finds his wild side with Colby. Alexander and McCormack do an equally nice job of unfolding the raw emotion underlying Colby and Len’s playful, care-free lifestyle. McCormack is adorably kooky as Colby and Alexander is puckishly irreverent – but appearances can be deceiving and both possess a gravitas that belies their youthful, rowdy behaviour.

With shouts to the SummerWorks run designers Cat Haywood (costumes) for the spot on character fashions, and Melissa Joakim (set/lighting) for creating the sleek, almost sterile, urban environment of Tanya and Mark’s condo living room (as designed by Tanya).

Yep, Delicacy has it all going on this time around. Loved the addition of the Labyrinth reference and the bit between Mark and Colby. Something else that struck me, then heard aloud from a man sitting in front of me mention to his friend as we were exiting the theatre, sparking a brief chat: Delicacy has the same feel of God of Carnage in the polar opposite dynamic of the two couples, in its brutal wit and socially current themes – and in its dark, dramedy of manners edge.

Delicacy runs until August 17 at Lower Ossington Theatre’s main space. I highly recommend reserving in advance or getting there well before the box office opens – the house was packed last night, and this is a very popular show and bound to sell out. I can also see this show going places, but don’t wait. Go see this. Now.

Deliciously sharp & brutally funny – Theatre Brouhaha’s Delicacy

Very happy that Ed, Andy and I finished up on The Drowning Girls set last night in time for me to make it out to the 10 p.m. performance of Delicacy at Factory Studio Theatre, where I bumped into another Alumnae Theatre pal, Tina McCulloch. I’d heard a lot of good things about Delicacy and really enjoyed playwright Kat Sandler’s Help Yourself at Toronto Fringe this past summer, so I was really looking forward to seeing it. And I wasn’t disappointed.

Deliciously sharp and brutally funny, Delicacy (which Sandler also directed) is part modern-day comedy of manners, part exploration of modern relationships. Married couple Tanya (Tennille Read) and Mark (Andy Trithardt) invite into their home Colby (Kelly McCormack) and Len (Kaleb Alexander), a couple they met during their virgin visit to swingers bar Wicked. And an eventful, erotic first time it was. Opposites attract here – Tanya and Mark are perfectly put together, mid-30s urban professionals, living in a pristine white loft designed by Tanya (for the play, by designer Alain Richer, with Sandler). Perfectly chosen pieces of “important” art. Indoor shoes. Uptight is the first impression we get. Colby and Len, on the other hand, are 30-ish, hail from the suburbs, work in non-white collar jobs and engage in a decidedly “crazy” bohemian lifestyle – and are no strangers to the swingers scene. Secrets, as well as previously unexpressed thoughts and feelings, emerge throughout the course of the evening, as both couples are forced to confront some unpleasant issues facing their marriages.

Sandler’s sharp, quick-witted dialogue is in good evidence here and this stand-out ensemble is more than up for the challenge. Read and Trithardt do a lovely job of peeling back the mask of Tanya and Mark’s perfectly coiffed, charcuterie-serving, HBO-viewing exterior to the turmoil that lies beneath, with Colby and Len as the catalysts. Read’s already sexy Tanya blossoms with Len, from impervious ice queen to hot passion-flower, while Trithardt’s controlled Mark finds his wild side with Colby. Alexander and McCormack do an equally nice job of unfolding the raw emotion underlying Colby and Len’s playful, care-free lifestyle. McCormack is adorably kooky as Colby and Alexander is puckishly irreverent – but appearances can be deceiving and both possess a gravitas that belies their youthful, rowdy behaviour.

The audience got an additional laugh when, during a heated scene between Tanya and Mark, Trithardt needed to break the fourth wall to excuse himself to the washroom, prompting a brief unscheduled intermission for the audience. They were on their second show of the evening – and the actors consume a lot of liquid during this play. The audience was good-humoured about the break and some folks took the opportunity to use the loo themselves. Live theatre, folks – keeping it real. These guys are pros, and upon returning to the stage, they backed up the scene a bit and carried on.

Big laughs, big life questions and big heart – a thoroughly enjoyable evening of theatre.

Delicacy has two more performances today (Sat, Nov 3): 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. Check the Theatre Brouhaha site for details and reservations: http://theatrebrouhaha.com/portfolio/delicacy/