A brush with celebrity in the electric, tantalizing, surprising Intangible Adorations: Experience the Icon

Ensemble with the October 15 guest Icon. Lighting design and effects by Carl Elster. 

 

Haus of Dada, Workman Arts, KC Cooper and Meek present Lisa Anita Wegner and Scott White’s electric, tantalizing and surprising Intangible Adorations: Experience the Icon as part of Workman Arts’ annual Rendezvous with Madness Festival, running in the Workman Arts Chapel. The multimedia performance piece is part film, part performance art, part social experiment—as it explores the allure of celebrity and its impact on celebrity mental health. Each performance, a different mystery celebrity appears as the Icon, disguised in a morph suit. Will they reveal themselves or choose to remain anonymous?

Featuring performers KC Cooper, Emily Gillespie, Amy Loucareas, Meek, Jane Smythe and Lisa Anita Wegner; and hosted by creators Wegner and Scott White, audience members are ushered into the space as VIP guests of a celebrity. You’re given a VIP tag with your host celebrity’s name (I was with Tilda Swinton’s group) and invited to be seated by group for a three-part immersive experience of performance art and brush with celebrity.

We’re introduced to the genesis of Intangible Adorations with a brief documentary film highlighting Lisa Anita Wegner’s history as an actor, producer and filmmaker; and the diagnosis of Complex PTSD that led her to set off on solo film projects and an exploration of identity, iconography and transformation—and to the genesis of the morph suit-clad Think Blank Human that served as inspiration for this current project. For Wegner, art saves her life every day.

Prior to the appearance of the Icon, an audience member is offered the opportunity to get a taste of celebrity by joining Wegner and White up front and centre, along with the ensemble. It is a strange and discomfiting experience for the volunteer, even though she’s an actor. We’re reminded that lots of celebrities and performers are actually quite shy of the spotlight when it’s focused on them personally, as opposed to when they’re in character or in performance. Many performers are, in fact, introverts.

Wegner and White move on to give us a few rules of engagement with the Icon. Hints are dropped at who the celebrity may be: a female pop star of great renown, a major celebrity. There’s some buzz in the audience that it’s Madonna. A respectful hush falls over the audience as White ushers her in; the white morph suit, worn with a deep purple costume over it, covers her from head to toe, making it challenging for her to see. We’re called up by group to line up for a photo and an autograph; and then invited to head across the hall, into the Red Chapel.

While it may have a Game of Thrones edge to the name, the Red Chapel is actually a place of celebrity adoration—the Church of Celebrity, if you will. Here, we may sit where we like as we watch the ensemble, now all dressed in morph suits and costumes, prepare the way for the Icon as they move and dance (music by Pink Moth) around the ornate wooden throne, set on a dais. It is here that we will have a brief audience with her.

The Icon arrives to sit on the throne; White hands her a microphone and, through voice modification to maintain her anonymity, she speaks to us. Sharing personal anecdotes of youthful adoration and a more recent fan girl moment with a famous actor she respects and admires at the Academy Awards, she is genuine, candid, vulnerable and circumspect. She goes on to share her experience of and response to being famous, including sessions with a therapist; her talk taking on a confessional tone. Humble, forthcoming and generous, she moves to reveal herself—and then, with apologies, decides against it. The second-hand celebrity gained by the audience at having spent time with her is less important than the revelation that we are all worthy and beautiful people in our own right.

And so our time with the Icon comes to a close. The buzz about her identity continues: too tall for Madonna. Katy Perry? Lady Gaga? As we head back into the first space to collect our coats, ensemble members, acting as reporters, ask us about our favourite celebrities and how our views may have changed as a result of this experience.

If you had any aspirations to be a celebrity, the experience may have you thinking otherwise. And the electric buzz about the possible identity of the Icon was, I’m sure, accompanied by skepticism about whether the guest was an actual celebrity at all. How does that change the experience? And how would a reveal have changed the experience? Were we more at ease, as she was anonymous, vulnerable—humanized, even? Come and see for yourself—you have three more chances.

Intangible Adorations: Experience the Icon continues in the Workman Arts Chapel until October 19, with performances on Oct 16 at 8:00, Oct 18 at 7:00 and Oct 19 at 2:00 (final performance to be followed by a Q&A). Advance tickets available online. Enter through the main entrance off of Dufferin St. (where the box office is located up a short flight of stairs); a member of the company will come to escort you to the performance space.

Here are some photos I took last night; lighting and FX by Carl Elster. Thanks to Scott White for the photo of me and the Icon. And thank you to the Icon for sharing her time and thoughts with us last night.

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Check out the trailer.

 

 

Deconstructing art & friendship in the razor-sharp, scathingly funny Art

Diego Matamoros, Oliver Dennis & Huse Madhavji. Set design by Gillian Gallow. Costume design by Dana Osborne. Lighting design by Bonnie Beecher. Photo by Dahlia Katz.

 

Soulpepper gives us a fly-on-the-wall look at how a debate on the merits of post-modern art turns to an exercise in deconstructing friendship in its razor-sharp, scathingly funny production of Yasmina Reza’s Art, translated by Christopher Hampton and directed by Philip Akin, assisted by Daniel Spragge. The cerebral and emotional responses to a newly acquired painting set off intense and surprising ripples, impacting the relationship of three friends. Art opened to an enthusiastic crowd at the Young Centre last night.

Serge (Diego Matamoros) is very excited and happy about a new painting he’s just purchased and proudly shows it off to his friend Marc (Oliver Dennis), who despite attempts at a tactful response, laughs and proclaims it to be shit. And not only that, Marc is extremely concerned about Serge—for spending a ridiculous amount of money on a painting that he believes to be worthless, and for possibly turning into a poser. Looking for a second opinion on the interaction, Serge and Marc individually approach their friend Yvan (Huse Madhavji), using him as a sounding board as they relate their description of what transpired.

Yvan is more tolerant and accepting of choices and differences, he doesn’t see what the big deal is. Plus, he’s got problems of his own to deal with—namely, the wedding planning hell he’s navigating with his fiancée and their respective parents and step-parents. And when he gets his own unveiling of the piece, he doesn’t like it—but he also doesn’t hate it either—and respects Serge’s choice.

The debate between friends on the merits of the painting and post-modern art in general  turns into a deconstruction of their relationship, whereby barbed quips become savage accusations and revelations. Brutal honesty on steroids unveils hidden jealousies, revulsion—and even a heated battle for dominance in friends’ social and intellectual lives.

Excellent work from this three-hander cast in this hilarious and revealing look at art and friendship. It’s delightful to watch the child-like level of glee and enthusiasm with which Matamoros’s Serge unveils his painting to his friends, navigating sight lines and pondering the canvas, hand on chin; this coupled with the pride of a burgeoning art collector who’s acquired an important work. With the heart of a philosopher and more than a few hints of a status-seeker, Serge is a complex man. Dennis brings an amiable but somewhat aloof air of precision and worldliness to the urbane Marc; a fan of the classics, Marc looks with withering skepticism upon modernity in art and lifestyle—and any whiff of the poseur is met with great derision and suspicion. Marc’s vehement opposition to and concern over Serge’s purchase of the painting is obviously masking something deeper about their relationship. Madhavji is a treat as Yvan, the understanding and open-minded friend in the middle who laughs with, as opposed to at, the situation; the Switzerland of the trio, Yvan often acts as an umpire for his two friends. Accused of being disingenuous, a doormat and a coward, he’s able to see both sides of the argument and feels no need to dominate his relationships—he just wants to be a good friend and husband.

A savage comedy of manners, Art is a compelling exploration of how a response to outside stimuli (in this case, a painting) can trigger a deeper, visceral reaction to those closest to us. Passions flare with biting criticism and conflict, only to be salvaged by good humour, good nature and agreeing to disagree.

Art continues at the Young Centre until September 1; advance tickets available online, or by calling the box office at 416-866-8666 or 1-888-898-1188.

Toronto Fringe: A powerful, intimate, darkly funny examination of the nature of art & personal validation in Bakersfield Mist

ytheatre Collective explores the nature of art and the human need for validation in its powerful, intimate and darkly funny Toronto Fringe production of Stephen Sachs’ Bakersfield Mist, directed by David Eden and running in the Trinity-St. Paul’s United Church Chapel Room.

Based on the true story of Teri Horton and a thrift shop find, Bakersfield Mist takes us to the trailer park home of bartender Maude Gutman (Marie Carriere Gleason) and her meeting with renowned New York art historian Lionel Percy (Thomas Gough), who’s been tasked with authenticating a painting Maude found in a thrift store.

What’s interesting about Maude’s dogged determination to have this work verified as an important American Master work is that it’s not about the money—it’s about the validation. She is deeply concerned about authenticity and personal validation; and this is something she has in common with Lionel, whose stringent standards of professionalism and honesty are the hallmarks of his work.

Hard-drinking, tough-talking and down-home friendly, Maude is the polar opposite of the sharp-pressed, formal and aloof Lionel—but as their meeting continues, they learn they have more in common than they could have ever imagined in that they are both fastidious, proud, stubborn—and haunted and troubled.

What makes art—and people—important? And who is to judge?

Bakersfield Mist continues in the Trinity-St. Paul’s Chapel until July 13; check the show page for exact dates/times.

Toronto Fringe: Delightful fable-inspired storytelling in magical, thoughtful Curious Contagious

curious_contagious_picture_2I first saw Vancouver’s Mind of a Snail perform Against Gravity two years ago at SummerWorks – and loved it – so I was excited to see that they were coming to Toronto Fringe this year to perform Curious Contagious in the Factory Theatre Mainspace. I caught their opening show yesterday afternoon. Mind of a Snail is Jessica Gabriel and Chloe Ziner.

Curious Contagious is a surreal, fable-inspired tale of a virus’s journey through a unicorn’s body. *SPOILER ALERT* Unicorn dreams of building a Donut Palace and just as the dream appears to be realized, construction is delayed when Unicorn contracts a puzzling illness after being bitten by an Amphibian on the build site. The virus’s life inside Unicorn is almost a play within the play, and includes entertaining narration courtesy of your friendly neighbourhood Arrow. Unicorn visits the Doctor, but traditional medicine cannot stop the virus, so the Doctor must resort to surgery – and Unicorn loses its horn. In an interesting moment of discovery, Amphibian introduces Unicorn to a mysterious, shaman-like Creature who lives underground at the building site and who now has possession of Unicorn’s horn. The Creature strikes a bargain with Unicorn to give the horn back – and the Unicorn must choose between its dream of building a business and its most beloved body part.

A beautiful and inspiring piece of visual storytelling, Curious Contagious uses shadow puppetry, live action movement and original music; and is suitable for all ages and accessible for non-English speakers. Gabriel and Ziner’s work is innovative and engaging, featuring quirky fun performances and mad puppetry skills. Part art, part theatre and part infotainment, it’s a thought-provoking commentary on viral illness and environmental responsibility.

Delightful fable-inspired storytelling with an environmentally friendly sensibility in magical, thoughtful Curious Contagious.

Curious Contagious continues at the Factory Theatre Mainspace until July 9. For ticket info and advance tickets/passes, check out the Fringe website.

SummerWorks: Big satirical fun with corporate branding & conspiracy in Tough Guy Mountain: a play

ToughGuyMountainaplay-400x533When I go to the Factory Theatre courtyard box office to pick up a program for the SummerWorks production of Tough Guy Mountain: a play, I’m directed to a stack of pink and white tri-fold brochures. Designed as an Intern Initiation Manual, the document includes illustrations of all of Tough Guy Mountain’s (aka TGM) key corporate players – executives, assistants and interns – along with brief descriptions. It’s a workplace field guide.

Written and directed by Iain Soder, with music by Rory Maclellan, Tough Guy Mountain: a play is set in the headquarters of “an extra-dimensional corporation that creates and manages premium quality brands.”  The futuristic pre-show music serves as a soundtrack, accompanying pre-recorded informational sound bites about the company and being a good intern. The show also incorporates projection with computer animation and live action (especially effective, and hysterically funny, with Holographic Kyle, played by Cale Weir), music numbers and even a dance break or two.

It’s Lisa’s (Jessica Brown) first day as an unpaid intern at TGM and, like Alice through the looking glass, she enters a strange new world of interesting and eccentric corporate entities. And manages to discover a conspiracy against art, finding herself forced to take action to save what’s important to her.

Really nice work from the cast in this fast-paced, crazy look at corporate branding and conspiracy. Brown shines as the wide-eyed, eager and ambitious Lisa, a plucky young intern who is clearly nobody’s fool. Other stand-outs include Elizabeth Johnston as the hilarious sharp-tongued dragon lady Queenie Empress; Jonathan Carroll as the neurotic and impulsive exec Joan Popular; and writer/director Soder’s slick, arrogant Ivan Phone. And big LOLs from William James Kasurak as the driven, robot-like Intern Phil; Sam Roberts as the obsessively committed Intern Stan; and Cat Bluemke as Beige Cathy, the perfectly efficient, deadpan executive assistant with a glare so withering, she doesn’t need to say a word. Shouts to Inez Genereux (TGM’s fashionable, artsy client) and Atleigh Homma (the precocious and sassy Holographic Lisa).

And shouts to graphic designer Bluemke for the most innovative program design I’ve seen.

It’s big satirical fun with corporate branding and conspiracy in Tough Guy Mountain: a play.

Tough Guy Mountain: a play continues at the Factory Theatre Studio until Aug 16 – check here for their scheduling.