Deconstructing art & friendship in the razor-sharp, scathingly funny Art

Diego Matamoros, Oliver Dennis & Huse Madhavji. Set design by Gillian Gallow. Costume design by Dana Osborne. Lighting design by Bonnie Beecher. Photo by Dahlia Katz.

 

Soulpepper gives us a fly-on-the-wall look at how a debate on the merits of post-modern art turns to an exercise in deconstructing friendship in its razor-sharp, scathingly funny production of Yasmina Reza’s Art, translated by Christopher Hampton and directed by Philip Akin, assisted by Daniel Spragge. The cerebral and emotional responses to a newly acquired painting set off intense and surprising ripples, impacting the relationship of three friends. Art opened to an enthusiastic crowd at the Young Centre last night.

Serge (Diego Matamoros) is very excited and happy about a new painting he’s just purchased and proudly shows it off to his friend Marc (Oliver Dennis), who despite attempts at a tactful response, laughs and proclaims it to be shit. And not only that, Marc is extremely concerned about Serge—for spending a ridiculous amount of money on a painting that he believes to be worthless, and for possibly turning into a poser. Looking for a second opinion on the interaction, Serge and Marc individually approach their friend Yvan (Huse Madhavji), using him as a sounding board as they relate their description of what transpired.

Yvan is more tolerant and accepting of choices and differences, he doesn’t see what the big deal is. Plus, he’s got problems of his own to deal with—namely, the wedding planning hell he’s navigating with his fiancée and their respective parents and step-parents. And when he gets his own unveiling of the piece, he doesn’t like it—but he also doesn’t hate it either—and respects Serge’s choice.

The debate between friends on the merits of the painting and post-modern art in general  turns into a deconstruction of their relationship, whereby barbed quips become savage accusations and revelations. Brutal honesty on steroids unveils hidden jealousies, revulsion—and even a heated battle for dominance in friends’ social and intellectual lives.

Excellent work from this three-hander cast in this hilarious and revealing look at art and friendship. It’s delightful to watch the child-like level of glee and enthusiasm with which Matamoros’s Serge unveils his painting to his friends, navigating sight lines and pondering the canvas, hand on chin; this coupled with the pride of a burgeoning art collector who’s acquired an important work. With the heart of a philosopher and more than a few hints of a status-seeker, Serge is a complex man. Dennis brings an amiable but somewhat aloof air of precision and worldliness to the urbane Marc; a fan of the classics, Marc looks with withering skepticism upon modernity in art and lifestyle—and any whiff of the poseur is met with great derision and suspicion. Marc’s vehement opposition to and concern over Serge’s purchase of the painting is obviously masking something deeper about their relationship. Madhavji is a treat as Yvan, the understanding and open-minded friend in the middle who laughs with, as opposed to at, the situation; the Switzerland of the trio, Yvan often acts as an umpire for his two friends. Accused of being disingenuous, a doormat and a coward, he’s able to see both sides of the argument and feels no need to dominate his relationships—he just wants to be a good friend and husband.

A savage comedy of manners, Art is a compelling exploration of how a response to outside stimuli (in this case, a painting) can trigger a deeper, visceral reaction to those closest to us. Passions flare with biting criticism and conflict, only to be salvaged by good humour, good nature and agreeing to disagree.

Art continues at the Young Centre until September 1; advance tickets available online, or by calling the box office at 416-866-8666 or 1-888-898-1188.

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Toronto Fringe: A powerful, intimate, darkly funny examination of the nature of art & personal validation in Bakersfield Mist

ytheatre Collective explores the nature of art and the human need for validation in its powerful, intimate and darkly funny Toronto Fringe production of Stephen Sachs’ Bakersfield Mist, directed by David Eden and running in the Trinity-St. Paul’s United Church Chapel Room.

Based on the true story of Teri Horton and a thrift shop find, Bakersfield Mist takes us to the trailer park home of bartender Maude Gutman (Marie Carriere Gleason) and her meeting with renowned New York art historian Lionel Percy (Thomas Gough), who’s been tasked with authenticating a painting Maude found in a thrift store.

What’s interesting about Maude’s dogged determination to have this work verified as an important American Master work is that it’s not about the money—it’s about the validation. She is deeply concerned about authenticity and personal validation; and this is something she has in common with Lionel, whose stringent standards of professionalism and honesty are the hallmarks of his work.

Hard-drinking, tough-talking and down-home friendly, Maude is the polar opposite of the sharp-pressed, formal and aloof Lionel—but as their meeting continues, they learn they have more in common than they could have ever imagined in that they are both fastidious, proud, stubborn—and haunted and troubled.

What makes art—and people—important? And who is to judge?

Bakersfield Mist continues in the Trinity-St. Paul’s Chapel until July 13; check the show page for exact dates/times.

Toronto Fringe: Delightful fable-inspired storytelling in magical, thoughtful Curious Contagious

curious_contagious_picture_2I first saw Vancouver’s Mind of a Snail perform Against Gravity two years ago at SummerWorks – and loved it – so I was excited to see that they were coming to Toronto Fringe this year to perform Curious Contagious in the Factory Theatre Mainspace. I caught their opening show yesterday afternoon. Mind of a Snail is Jessica Gabriel and Chloe Ziner.

Curious Contagious is a surreal, fable-inspired tale of a virus’s journey through a unicorn’s body. *SPOILER ALERT* Unicorn dreams of building a Donut Palace and just as the dream appears to be realized, construction is delayed when Unicorn contracts a puzzling illness after being bitten by an Amphibian on the build site. The virus’s life inside Unicorn is almost a play within the play, and includes entertaining narration courtesy of your friendly neighbourhood Arrow. Unicorn visits the Doctor, but traditional medicine cannot stop the virus, so the Doctor must resort to surgery – and Unicorn loses its horn. In an interesting moment of discovery, Amphibian introduces Unicorn to a mysterious, shaman-like Creature who lives underground at the building site and who now has possession of Unicorn’s horn. The Creature strikes a bargain with Unicorn to give the horn back – and the Unicorn must choose between its dream of building a business and its most beloved body part.

A beautiful and inspiring piece of visual storytelling, Curious Contagious uses shadow puppetry, live action movement and original music; and is suitable for all ages and accessible for non-English speakers. Gabriel and Ziner’s work is innovative and engaging, featuring quirky fun performances and mad puppetry skills. Part art, part theatre and part infotainment, it’s a thought-provoking commentary on viral illness and environmental responsibility.

Delightful fable-inspired storytelling with an environmentally friendly sensibility in magical, thoughtful Curious Contagious.

Curious Contagious continues at the Factory Theatre Mainspace until July 9. For ticket info and advance tickets/passes, check out the Fringe website.

SummerWorks: Big satirical fun with corporate branding & conspiracy in Tough Guy Mountain: a play

ToughGuyMountainaplay-400x533When I go to the Factory Theatre courtyard box office to pick up a program for the SummerWorks production of Tough Guy Mountain: a play, I’m directed to a stack of pink and white tri-fold brochures. Designed as an Intern Initiation Manual, the document includes illustrations of all of Tough Guy Mountain’s (aka TGM) key corporate players – executives, assistants and interns – along with brief descriptions. It’s a workplace field guide.

Written and directed by Iain Soder, with music by Rory Maclellan, Tough Guy Mountain: a play is set in the headquarters of “an extra-dimensional corporation that creates and manages premium quality brands.”  The futuristic pre-show music serves as a soundtrack, accompanying pre-recorded informational sound bites about the company and being a good intern. The show also incorporates projection with computer animation and live action (especially effective, and hysterically funny, with Holographic Kyle, played by Cale Weir), music numbers and even a dance break or two.

It’s Lisa’s (Jessica Brown) first day as an unpaid intern at TGM and, like Alice through the looking glass, she enters a strange new world of interesting and eccentric corporate entities. And manages to discover a conspiracy against art, finding herself forced to take action to save what’s important to her.

Really nice work from the cast in this fast-paced, crazy look at corporate branding and conspiracy. Brown shines as the wide-eyed, eager and ambitious Lisa, a plucky young intern who is clearly nobody’s fool. Other stand-outs include Elizabeth Johnston as the hilarious sharp-tongued dragon lady Queenie Empress; Jonathan Carroll as the neurotic and impulsive exec Joan Popular; and writer/director Soder’s slick, arrogant Ivan Phone. And big LOLs from William James Kasurak as the driven, robot-like Intern Phil; Sam Roberts as the obsessively committed Intern Stan; and Cat Bluemke as Beige Cathy, the perfectly efficient, deadpan executive assistant with a glare so withering, she doesn’t need to say a word. Shouts to Inez Genereux (TGM’s fashionable, artsy client) and Atleigh Homma (the precocious and sassy Holographic Lisa).

And shouts to graphic designer Bluemke for the most innovative program design I’ve seen.

It’s big satirical fun with corporate branding and conspiracy in Tough Guy Mountain: a play.

Tough Guy Mountain: a play continues at the Factory Theatre Studio until Aug 16 – check here for their scheduling.