Pun & games for kids of all ages, with hilarious panto good times, in RaPUNzel

 

Amelia Welcher as RaPUNzel (top) and Kristen Foote as Bunny (bottom)—photo by Burke Campbell

 

Red Sandcastle Theatre’s Panto Players are back at it again with more pantomime shenanigans in RaPUNzel, written by Jane A. Shields and Rosemary Doyle, and directed by Jackie English. RaPUNzel marks the company’s 7th annual holiday panto.

This time, the Panto Players take us to Italy in this delightful mashup of beloved fairy tales, pop music and musical theatre tunes as they deliver familiar stories and characters with some goofy—at times surprising—twists. A very pregnant Twankey’s (Chris Gibbs) cravings coax her husband (Farid Yazdani) to pilfer neighbouring ogre Monsanto’s (Taran Beaty) garden for lettuce. His mission becomes compromised and he’s caught in the act, forcing the expecting couple to make a terrible choice. Their thievery comes at a price: they must hand their baby over to the ogre!

Sixteen years later, and having held out on her end of the deal and lost her husband, the Widow Twankey gives in and the ogre gets her daughter RaPUNzel (Amelia Welcher), and locks her in an impenetrable, magically protected tower. Luckily, RaPUNzel’s nimble-footed bff hare friend Bunny (Kristen Foote) is able to get in and out of the tower, and provide our heroine with some company as they try to figure out how to get her out of there. Meanwhile, RaPUNzel’s hair is getting super long—and we wonder if the ogre is as naughty as he wants everyone to believe; after all, his faithful sidekick is a Chicken (Sebastian Marziali). And is Twankey as nice as she appears?

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Chris Gibbs as Widow Twankey, with Co-writer/AD Rosemary Doyle in the background—photo by Burke Campbell

Enter the handsome, though somewhat dim, Prince (Yazdani). Will he be able to free RaPUNzel from her tower prison? To add to the fun, director English returns as our favourite sassy pink cat, who first arrives on sabbatical, but comes on board to assist as only this cat can. And co-writer Doyle appears as the set-changing, noise-shushing Nonna,* a sweet old granny who suffers no fools.

It’s all very wacky and pun-filled—and we’re all invited to join in the fun. Gibbs gives a diabolically silly turn as the vain and manipulative Twankey; and Yazdani does an awesome Don Corleone impression as her husband, as well as a comedic, scene-stealing turn as the dim-witted yet determined Prince. Beaty is hilariously conflicted as the ogre Monsanto; holding RaPUNzel captive for “reasons,” the ogre’s love and care of his garden makes you wonder how bad to the bone he really is—and he brings some kick-ass guitar and vocals to that George Thorogood classic in the process.

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Taran Beaty as the ogre Monsanto, with Sebastian Marziali as Chicken (left), Chris Gibbs as Twankey (background) & Amelia Welcher as RaPUNzel (right)—photo by Burke Campbell

 

Welcher is adorably precocious as the feisty punster RaPUNzel; and impresses with great vocal chops on a Pink power ballad. Foote and Marziali give hilarious turns in multiple roles, starting with a pair of mobsters and a couple of dancing lettuce. Foote is hysterical and educational as RaPUNzel’s bff hare pal Bunny, schooling us on the differences between the hare and the rabbit. And Marziali brings cute and wacky fun as Monsanto’s right-hand man Chicken, providing comic observations and cheeky advice.

We’re invited—and encouraged—to cheer the heroes and boo the villain, and sing and groove along with the pop tunes, rap and musical theatre songs. And a few lucky young audience members will have a chance to get in on the action.

With big shouts to stage manager Deborah Ann Frankel, who’s been with this wild and wacky ride from the beginning; running all the lighting and sound cues, and shepherding the cast.

Pun and games for kids of all ages, with hilarious panto good times, in RaPUNzel.

RaPUNzel continues at Red Sandcastle until January 7, with evening performances at 7pm on December 29 and 30, and January 2-6; and matinees at 3pm on December 28 and 30, and January 3, 6 and 7. Get your advance tickets online (see the date-specific ticket links on the show page) or by calling 416-845-9411.

*As of December 28, Nonna will be played by Panto Players veteran Brenda Somers.

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New Ideas Festival: Attraction, secrets & brave new worlds in eclectic, insightful Week Two program

Alumnae Theatre Company continues its 2017 edition of the New Ideas Festival (NIF) with an eclectic Week Two program. The annual festival includes three weeks of short new plays and full-length readings, including four plays and one reading each week, running in the Studio space.

The Red Lacquered Box by Burke Campbell, directed by Lynn Weintraub. In this one-woman period drama, secretary Madame Gilles (Aleksandra Maslennikova) relates what she knows about the events leading up to the scandalous tragedy involving her employer Madame Tullée. Maslennikova’s Mme Gilles is a fastidious, bright-eyed charmer; a fine performance as she shifts between characters, including the dramatic, effervescent Mme Tullée and her suave, sophisticated lover Derek. What is the significance of that red lacquered box?

Parallax by Michelle Glennie, directed by Ara Glenn-Johanson. Brave new worlds collide in this hilarious, sharp tale of two pairs of friends/colleagues boldly going. Physicist/surgeon Marie Soleil (Melanie Leon) and Expos baseball star Rock (Duncan Rowe) have been selected to train as astronauts for a one-way trip to Mars; part of their mission will be to help populate the new Earth colony. Meanwhile, back in the 1660s, Louise (Wendy Fox) and Laura (Taylor Shouldice) are Filles du Roi, setting off aboard a ship to New France, to help populate the new French colony. What happens when these two pairs meet during an event in the space/time continuum has surprising results.

Y by Rosemary Doyle, directed by Sandra Cardinal. When Lyona (Sandi Globerman) invites Fyona (Alison Parovel), the daughter of close family friends who moved to England, for a visit, her sons George (Aury Barnett) and Henry (Taylor Bogaert) wonder what’s up. Family secrets emerge in a series of flashbacks, including Lyona’s husband Arthur (Barnett), and family friends Thomas (Bogaert) and Helen (Parovel). Actions reveal priorities in this intimate, at times funny, portrait of family and friendship dynamics.

Professionally Ethnic by Bobby Del Rio, directed by Rouvan Silogix. A sharply funny and insightful look at perceptions of diversity and inclusion in Canadian theatre. Young South Asian Canadian actor William (Ronak Singh) finds himself torn between landing a starring role with renowned white artistic director Gerrard (Rob Candy) and his conscience when the job requires that he become a stereotypical multicultural poster boy for the theatre company’s massive rebranding campaign. With a little help from his friends—best friend Kyle (Simon Bennett), who is white, and girlfriend Tracey (Chantel McDonald), a black equity PhD student—he’s reminded of who he really is. LOL problem-solving shenanigans ensue. Really nice work all around from the cast; especially funny is the nightmare presentation scene, where Gerrard and Tracey present their perceptions and findings of William’s situation.

The Week Two program also includes a reading on Mar 18 at noon: Who You Callin Black, Eh? by Rita Shelton Deverell, directed by Donald Molnar.

Attraction, secrets and brave new worlds in the New Ideas eclectic, insightful Week Two program.

The NIF Week Two program continues until Mar 19 and the festival continues to Mar 26; evening performances at 8p.m. and matinées at 2:30p.m., including talkbacks after the readings and the Saturday matinées. It’s an intimate space and a popular fest, so advance booking online or early arrival (box office opens one hour before show time—cash only) are strongly recommended.

 

 

Pirates! Genies! Fishing! Wacky meta panto fun with A Ladd’n His Cat!

Red Sandcastle Theatre’s Panto Players have cooked up their most meta holiday panto ever! Written by Jane A. Shields and Red Sandcastle A.D. Rosemary Doyle, A Ladd’n His Cat! opened to an enthusiastic audience at Red Sandcastle’s storefront space at Queen St. East and Logan, Toronto last night.

Played out as a story within a story within a story, there’s a Thousand and One Nights quality to this year’s panto (the company’s 6th), with storytellers spinning tales for their lives.

It all starts on the high seas, where a pirate named Russell (Doyle, who also did the set and costumes) has taken a Lad (Ada Balon) and his Cat (Jackie English) under his wing among his band of pirates. When the Pirate King (Kristopher Bowman) becomes displeased with the Cat, the wily critter strikes a bargain to enthrall him with a story—where he must be the hero.

In the Cat’s tale, we find a hard-working, fastidious Fisherman (Brenda Somers), his wife (Susan Finlayson) and daughter Gesundheit (Jennifer Lloyd) toiling away on the water, where the Fisherman casts precisely three times a day. Catching a rusty old bottle on the third cast, Gesundheit unlocks a Genie (Kristen Foote). Extremely irate after years of captivity and thirsty for vengeance, the Genie threatens the family with death—but the quick-thinking Gesundheit makes a deal to entertain and divert her with a story in exchange for her family’s life.

And Gesundheit’s story brings us to the classic tale of Aladdin and the Magic Lamp—with a twist, of course, as this is the Panto Players, after all.

Aladdin’s mother the Widow Twankey (Adam Bonney) is beside herself with worry. She works her fingers to the bone at the family’s laundry business, but her teenaged son Aladdin (Bowman) is a lazy brat. Forced out of the house to find a job, Aladdin catches a glimpse of the fair Princess (Foote) as she takes a stroll through the market with her mother the Queen (Somers) and the court Magician (Bernie Henry), who has an upcoming marriage in the works with Handsome Prince (Balon).

Looking for big money and an easy job, Aladdin accompanies the Magician to a cave, where he finds precious jewels (Lloyd, Balon and Foote), a bat (Finlayson) and a magic lamp. Re-enter the Cat, this time as the Genie of the Lamp.

Plot upon plot upon plot later (with plots uncovered along the way), we finish where we started. And it all works out in its own implausibly plausible way.

Incorporating popular songs—from Gilbert and Sullivan to Beyoncé—and including some fabulous choreography, stunning costumes and magical set pieces, plus audience participation, A Ladd’n His Cat! is a whole lotta panto fun for kids of all ages.

Great work from the entire cast, with nearly all playing two or more roles throughout. Stand-outs include English, as everyone’s favourite pink Cat; surly and cheeky, but always lending a hand, this Cat is one smart cookie. Bowman gives great comic turns as the proud, narcissistic Pirate King (and look out for him at the Shaw Festival this coming season); and the petulant, lazy-ass Aladdin, who winds up being a hero in spite of himself.

Bonney is a riot as Widow Twankey, Aladdin’s put-upon, stressed out mother; and as a tattooed, sensitive pirate. Foote is hilarious as the fetching and enraged Genie of the Bottle; and as the self-absorbed, selfie-taking Princess. Henry is delightfully sly and manipulative as the Magician; and Balon deftly runs the gamut from the lovable, innocent Lad to the stand-offish oaf Handsome Prince.

With big shouts to stage manager Deborah Ann Frankel, keeping it all going from the booth; and Panto Players alumna Margaret Lamarre, who assisted Doyle with sewing the costumes—even on her birthday!

Pirates! Genies! Fishing! Plus our favourite pink Cat. Wacky meta panto fun with A Ladd’n His Cat!

A Ladd’n His Cat! continues at Red Sandcastle until Dec 31; reserve your spot in advance by emailing redsandcastletheatre@gmail.com or by calling 416-845-9411.

Photo: (top) Adam Bonney, Ada Balon, Jennifer Lloyd, Kristopher Bowman & Kristen Foote; (middle) Susan Finlayson & Brenda Somers; (bottom) Bernie Henry, Jackie English, Deborah Ann Frankel & Rosemary Doyle. Photo by Burke Campbell.

Noel Coward classic gets digital age makeover – & a dog – in Red Sandcastle Theatre’s delightful iBlithe

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David Huband, Margaret Lamarre, Maria Syrgiannis, Robert Keller & Adrian Proszowski – photo by Burke Campbell

A Noel Coward favourite is getting a modern-day, multimedia twist for the iPhone age at Red Sandcastle Theatre in Rosemary Doyle’s iBlithe, directed by David Huband. The opening got bumped to last night after one of the actors got a gig on Thursday, resulting in an additional show being added on Wed, Mar 31.

A few changes from Blithe Spirit: iBlithe’s running time is shorter, the Bradmans are now a gay couple, and Edith the maid is now Edith the dog. The record player becomes an iPhone, and projection is used to great effect for the emergence of otherworldly visitation.

When Charles (Huband) and Ruth (Maria Syrgiannis) Condomine invite psychic Mme. Arcati (Margaret Lamarre) to their country home for a séance, only their friends Dr. George (Adrian Proszowski) and Victor (Robert Keller) Bradman know that Charles is out to get some background research on a book he’s working on – he’s not a true believer in the occult. And the resulting appearance of the ghost of his first wife Elvira (Doyle) gives Charles way more than he bargained for.

The cast takes us on a wacky, hilariously funny trip of British manners, Coward wit and supernatural shenanigans – and the packed house loved it! Huband’s multilayered performance of Charles finds all the sweet spots; a likeable if not somewhat smug, henpecked husband, his witty life of contentment and country home insulation is turned topsy-turvy when he finds himself living with two wives – and his conflicted loyalties and emotions show. Syrgiannis brings a lovely, sharp-witted edge to Ruth, a feisty force to be reckoned with that turns jealous and desperate at Elvira’s appearance – and she finds herself at wit’s end as a result. Lamarre is spellbinding as the eccentric Arcati; a deeply committed, if not batty, medium who finds herself torn between the seriousness of the Condomines’ situation and sheer delight at the thrill of a complex and challenging case. Doyle is a bratty treat as Elvira; playfully coquettish and frolicking in the grey area of moral hygiene, there’s a spoiled child beneath that slinky exterior – and she’s got more on that ghostly mind than one might think. The Bradmans are an adorable, sophisticated couple: Proszowski’s Dr. George is an affable and sympathetic, with a dry wit and an efficient, take charge manner; and Keller brings a charming, indiscreet and irreverent air of humour to the slapdash Robert. And Edith may be a stuffed terrier, but she is abarkably sweet.

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Margaret Lamarre & Rosemary Doyle – photo by Deborah Ann Framkel

With big shouts to spooktacular stage manager Deborah Ann Frankel for all the multitasking, including running sound and lighting cues, and SFX (with the cast). And the recording used in this modern-day production for the séance scenes is both unique and fabulous.

Noel Coward classic gets a digital age makeover – and a dog – in Red Sandcastle Theatre’s delightful iBlithe.

iBlithe continues at Red Sandcastle today and runs till April 2; check the website for dates, times and ticket info. It’s an intimate space, so advance booking recommended.