Foul treachery, sweet slithering manipulation in Shakespeare Bash’d compelling, accessible Richard III

James Wallis in Richard III. Photo by Kyle Purcell.

 

Shakespeare Bash’d opened its 2018 season to a sold-out house at the Monarch Tavern last night with a classic tale of murderous machinations and royal double-crosses with its production of Shakespeare’s Richard III, directed by Julia Nish-Lapidus with associate director Megan Miles.

For those not familiar with the history and characters behind this drama: no worries, there’s a handy, brief introduction in the program to orient you to the background and major players in this story of violence, betrayal and plotting over the English throne.

The War of the Roses has just ended, with The House of York (who wore the white rose) victorious over the House of Lancaster (wore the red rose). Taking advantage of the recent upheaval and a country still divided, Richard of Gloucester (James Wallis) turns his brother King Edward IV (Trevor Pease), who’s been suffering ill health, against their brother Clarence (also played by Pease; do-able as Clarence and Edward are never in a scene together). Playing the long game, Richard is counting on Edward’s imminent death – which, when it comes to pass, only leaves him with two young princes to deal with.

Weaving a complex, tangled web of deceit that includes toxic gossip dissemination and emotional manipulation, Richard manages to calm the wrath of Anne (Jennifer Dzialoszynski), widow of the usurped Prince of Wales, who he slayed – in that classic complex and difficult two-hander that takes place over the casket of her dead husband. She later has little choice but to consent to marry him. Unrelenting in his drive and ambition, and dangerously unpredictable, even Richard’s followers become uneasy around him – and rightly so. As the bodies pile up on his way to the throne, friends who supported him – like Hastings (Kelly Wong) and Buckingham (Cosette Derome) – are executed when he whiffs even the slightest scent of disloyalty or hesitation in executing his orders.

And just when you think Richard can’t get any more disgusting, after he orders the assassination of his two nephew princes, he gets rid his wife Anne (poison) and goes on to demand that his brother’s widowed queen Elizabeth (Catherine Rainville) speak to her daughter Elizabeth (his niece) to prepare her to be his queen!

Richard III’s crimes do not go unpunished. In the end, the House of Lancaster rises up and Richmond (Drew O’Hara) rallies supporters to depose the tyrant king and reunify the country.

Outstanding work from the multitasking ensemble in this complex, dynamic tale of familial homicide, vengeance and bringing down a tyrant: Cosette Derome, Jade Douris, Jennifer Dzialoszynski, Suzette McCanny, Shalyn McFaul, Drew O’Hara, Trevor Pease, Catherine Rainville, James Wallis, Kelly Wong and Joseph Zita. Wallis gives us a subtle, cunning and menacing Richard. Richard is the king of fake news – and, as we know from current experience, when it comes to fake news, he who smelt it dealt it. Casually executing acts of horrible violence, Richard is adept at masking his true feelings and masterfully manipulates public opinion, playing the humble and devout servant of the realm when it suits his skeevy, scheming purposes.

Other stand-outs include Derome’s ambitious and sly Buckingham; friend and loyal supporter of Richard’s schemes, even she can’t help but be disturbed by his actions and orders. McCanny is fierce in her curses and merciless in her rage as Margaret, the widow of Henry VI. McFaul (as the Duchess of York, Richard’s mother) and Dzialoszynski (as Anne) give heartbreaking performances in their vengeance-filled grief over their lost husbands and kinsmen; overcome by circumstance and feelings of powerlessness, they fight back as best as they can with their words. And, speaking of fighting words, Rainville (Elizabeth) is fearless in her dagger spitting face-off against Richard, ferociously attempting to defend her young daughter even as she mourns her lost husband and murdered sons.

Pease gives several strong performances: the mild-mannered, baffled Clarence; the regal and struggling new King Edward; and the chilling Ratcliffe (Richard’s muscle). O’Hara is an inspiring Richmond, giving a rousing pre-battle speech in the vein of that famous Henry V speech; seeking to heal a brutally injured country, Richmond plans to bring peace and unity in his victory. Adding some welcome comic relief are Wong’s wry-witted, smug Hastings; and, sent to take care of Clarence in the Tower, O’Hara and Zita’s darkly comic assassins become hilariously dazed and confused when confronted with their target.

This minimalist production is staged effectively and dynamically in an alley format (audience on both sides of the long, narrow playing area); and the hard rock music interludes, and jeans, t-shirt and sweater costuming, give it a contemporary edge.

Foul treachery, sweet slithering manipulation and a tyrant falls in Shakespeare Bash’d compelling, accessible Richard III.

Richard III continues at the Monarch Tavern till February 11; advance tickets are already sold out, but if you arrive early, you can get on the wait list 30 minutes before show time ($25 – cash only).

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Toronto Fringe: The ladies rule in bawdy, hilarious tale of scheming & revenge in The Merry Wives of Windsor

Lynne Griffin & Sean Sullivan in The Merry Wives of Windsor - photo by Madison Golshani, Daniel Pascale
Lynne Griffin & Sean Sullivan in The Merry Wives of Windsor – photo by Madison Golshani, Daniel Pascale

Shakespeare BASH’d is back at the Victory Café again for Toronto Fringe this year, with a bawdy good fun production of Shakespeare’s The Merry Wives of Windsor, co-directed by James Wallis and Catherine Rainville.

While the infamous drunken sot Sir John Falstaff (Sean Sullivan) schemes to get into the petticoats of Mistresses Ford (Suzette McCanny) and Page (Julia Nish-Lapidus), Mistress Quickly (Lynne Griffin) plays on the hearts and wallets of three prospective suitors vying for the hand of Miss Anne Page (Jade Douris) – and makes a pretty penny while doing so. Ford (Andrew Joseph Richardson) wrongly suspects his wife of infidelity and hatches a plan of his own to catch her out. The women are the wiser, and set the plans of all scheming men astray.

Merry Wives has a great, fun, rollicking ensemble, which rolls out this tale with great speed and dexterity. Stand-outs include Griffin (who Lost Girl fans will recognize as the Aswang lady Halima in season 1’s “Food for Thought”), who is a delight as the cunning Mistress Quickly, with a mischievous twinkle in her eye as she amasses a bosom full of cash. Sullivan’s wayward knight Falstaff is all lust and bravado, with shades of Jack Nicholson, ever with some unsavoury plot on his mind – even as each of his machinations fall to pieces. McCanny and Nish-Lapidus make a fine pair as Mistresses Ford and Page, the not so desperate housewives of Windsor who prove themselves as resourceful as Mistress Quickly – and more than a match for the silly men. Richardson is hilarious in Ford’s righteous indignation and plotting over a perceived betrayal from his wife; and Zachary Parkhurst is a laugh riot as the barely understandable, pompous suitor Dr. Caius.

With shouts to costume designer Amanda Shaw and Simon Rainville for the music.

The ladies rule in this hilariously funny tale of scheming, revenge and shenanigans.

the_merry_wives_of_windsor-web-250x274The Merry Wives of Windsor continues every day for the rest of this week at Victory Café: Wednesday – Saturday at 7 p.m., with a final performance on Sun, July 12 at 5 p.m. Get your tix ahead of time for this one, folks – and leave yourself plenty of time to get a good seat and a pint.