Good silly panto fun in Jack and the BeansTalk—A Merry Magical Pantomime

Torrent Productions presents its annual Coxwell/Gerrard neighbourhood holiday panto with Jack and the BeansTalk—A Merry Magical Pantomime, written and directed by Rob Torr, with music direction by Paul Moody and choreography by Stephanie Graham; running at Royal Canadian Legion Branch #001 (243 Coxwell Ave, Toronto, just south of Gerrard St. East). A missing treasured chicken, magic talking beans, a saucy Dame, a love-smitten young hero and a diabolical villain combine with song, dance, slapstick and wordplay for some good silly fun for all ages in this panto adaptation of a fairy tale classic.

When a banished, disenchanted Fairy (an adorably sweet and wry-witted Jamie McRoberts) catches wind that the Giant (voiced with menacing force by Cynthia Dale) has sent the evil villain Fleshcreep (Cyrus Lane, living up to the name and relishing the deliciously diabolical nastiness) to find a magic chicken that lays golden eggs, she begins to reclaim her magic and casts a spell to protect the chicken. This, however, doesn’t stop Fleshcreep from pressuring local Squire (played with regal dignity and moral conflict by William Fisher), who knows something about that chicken, to raise taxes on an already financially stressed population.

Local farmer Dame Trott (Greg Campbell in a saucy redhead Queen Mum meets Coronation Street maven turn) is at her wit’s end about how to pay the rent and instructs her son Jack (played with charismatic high energy by Caulin Moore) to sell their beloved cow Daisy (operated by Christopher Fulton and Tim Funnell, giving her eyelash-batting cuteness and swagger). In a series of tricky transactions, Jack ends up selling Daisy for a handful of talking beans! Meanwhile, the Squire’s daughter Jill (Teresa Tucci, with feisty determination and positivity) has been taken by the Giant. Good thing those beans, with the help of the Fairy, grow into a massive beanstalk that leads to the Giant’s castle—and Jack sets off to save Jill. Our hero is assisted throughout by the hilarious Ed #1 (Tim Funnell) and Ed #2 (Christopher Fulton), who entertain us and befuddle the bad guy.

Heroic deeds, secret plots, surprising revelations, and even a wedding, emerge; all accompanied by pop music favourites, some impressive hoofing and synchronized movement, and wacky slapstick and wordplay. And, of course, since this is a panto, audience participation is encouraged and appreciated. There’s a real community atmosphere with this production, with both the company and the folks from the neighbourhood making this an annual holiday tradition; and local business sponsors are shouted out throughout the performance, with live commercial spots.

Jack and the BeansTalk continues till December 29; please note the early curtain time of 7:00 pm for evening performances. Advance tickets available online, by calling 1-800-838-3006 or at the door.

Classic Canadian Gothic comes home in the quirky, magical, lyrical Trout Stanley

Natasha Mumba, Stephen Jackman-Torkoff & Shakura Dickson. Set & costume design by Shannon Lea Doyle. Lighting design by Raha Javanfar. Photo by Joseph Michael Photography.

 

Claudia Dey’s Canadian Gothic classic Trout Stanley comes home to Factory Theatre for a new production, cast through an African Canadian immigrant lens, directed by Mumbi Tindyebwa Otu, assisted by Coleen MacPherson—opening last night in the Mainspace. Quirky, magical and lyrical, twin sisters celebrating their 30th birthday—the same day their parents died 10 years ago—find an unexpected guest in their secluded house in the woods. Love, family and devotion are assessed and put to the test as relationship dynamics evolve in hilarious and poignant ways.

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Shakura Dickson & Natasha Mumba. Set & costume design by Shannon Lea Doyle. Lighting design by Raha Javanfar. Photo by Joseph Michael Photography.

Set in 1990s rural B.C., twin sisters Sugar (Shakura Dickson) and Grace (Natasha Mumba) Ducharme have only had each other since their parents died on their birthday 10 years ago. The introverted Sugar hasn’t left the house since, and refuses to stop wearing their mother’s track suit; while extrovert Grace dons a stylin’ mauve jumpsuit and goes to work at the town dump every day, scoring the occasional print modelling gig—including a recent billboard ad. It’s their 30th birthday; and along with the tragic memory of their parents’ deaths, the date seems to be extra cursed. Every year since they were orphaned, a woman in the area who shares their birthday has gone missing and turned up dead, found by Grace. And this year, the Scrabble Champ stripper has disappeared on her way home from work.

Things get even stranger when an unexpected guest on a mission turns up at the twins’ secluded house in the woods: a young, handsome-ish man with the unlikely name Trout Stanley, who we soon learn has much in common with the sisters—and who is immediately and inexplicably drawn to Sugar. Like the twins, he was orphaned and has set out on foot, searching for the lake where his parents drowned—and now he’s lost. But, with a possible murderer on the loose, can Sugar and Grace trust him?

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Stephen Jackman-Torkoff. Set & costume design by Shannon Lea Doyle. Lighting design by Raha Javanfar. Photo by Joseph Michael Photography.

Outstanding work from the cast in this captivating, mercurial, lyrical three-hander; playing characters that are all both feral and fragile in their own way. Dickson brings an adorable child-like sweetness to the soft-spoken, broken-hearted Sugar; singing snatches of made-up songs, and singing and dancing to her mother’s old Heart record, Sugar lives in a world of her own, surrounded by dozens of the tragic biographic figurines she used to make (shouts to set designer Shannon Lea Doyle for the beautiful, detailed set of the Ducharme home). Mumba brings a self-confident swagger and fierceness to Grace; entertainingly vain and ferociously protective of Sugar—her polar opposite and perfect complement—Grace more than lives up to her nickname of Lion Queen. The world the sisters have created together is a poignant and unique combination of tender personal rituals and pragmatic harsh realities. For Sugar, the world is full of nostalgia, music and magic; drawn to the macabre, it’s the everyday moments that overwhelm her. Grace sees and smells the hardness of the world every day, but still manages to find wonder and beauty—even at the dump. Jackman-Torkoff is a playful, puckish delight as Trout Stanley; mercurial and impish, Trout is part wild man, part philosopher, part poet. He has big feelings and huge dreams; unflinching in his cause, his encounter with the sisters changes him too. As unexpected as his lost boy arrival is for the twins, what he finds is both new and surprising.

This fairy tale-like adventure plays out with memory, heart and singular individuality as all three characters reveal their secrets and find a way to move on with their lives.

Trout Stanley continues in the Factory Theatre Mainspace until November 10; advance tickets available online or by calling the box office at 416- 504-9971.

In the meantime, check out Phil Rickaby’s Stageworthy Podcast interview with actor Shakura Dickson.