Childhood friends grow up, lose touch & take a wacky trip out of bounds in big fun, big-hearted Playday Mayday

caitlin-howden-mike-hughes-colin-munch-anders-yates-matt-goldberg-photo-by-john-gundy
Caitlin Howden, Mike Hughes, Colin Munch, Anders Yates & Matt Goldberg in Playday Mayday – photo by John Gundy

Remember playing Twister, Operation, Risk? Ever have an imaginary friend, pretend you were in space, turn your hand into a firearm? When you were a kid, was there a place in your town or neighbourhood you weren’t allowed to go – a place that was out of bounds?

Uncalled For does it all – and then some – in their thoughtful comic return to childhood games and fantasy in Playday Mayday, running now in the Theatre Passe Muraille (TPM) Mainspace, produced in association with the Toronto Sketch Comedy Festival. Written and directed by Matt Goldberg, Mike Hughes, Dan Jeannotte, Jacynthe Lalonde, Colin Munch and Anders Yates, the cast features Goldberg, Caitlin Howden, Hughes, Munch and Yates.

Five friends, once inseparable as they played together around their coastal town, have grown up and apart with adult busy-ness and responsibilities. After all those years of meaning to keep in touch, they gather at the edge of a cliff, awkwardly trying to reconnect at water’s edge. Then, something weird happens. One by one, they each lose their cellphones, watching with horror as the devices fall into the water of high tide below. Bruce (Munch) gets called into work, while the others wait for low tide to venture down. Down into out of bounds (OOB) to retrieve their phones. And then, something magical happens.

OOB is a world of eternal childhood, where grown-ups rekindle their sense of fun and play – and the four friends (Goldberg, Howden, Hughes and Yates) launch into games. Childhood games with an adult twist, like corporate Twister, a deadly game of 20 questions, hand gun arms dealer, a slimy amphibian imaginary friend with an agenda, and a unique version of musical chairs that features hip hop and period dance moves (choreography by Holly Greco and Stephanie McKenna). Oh, and the audience gets to play too – but you’ll have to go see for yourselves.

Meanwhile, Bruce has been working at the games call centre when his boss Mr. Wolf (Hughes) announces that there’s a situation in OOB. Concerned about his friends, Bruce volunteers to go down to save them. Of course, he ends up joining in on the fun and games. Which become not so fun when Mr. Wolf threatens to leave the five friends stranded, with the incoming high tide fast approaching.

Awesome work from the ensemble. Stand-out moments include a spacewalk with a twist; an impressive display of tongue-twisting alliteration in a courtroom scene; and an intergalactic space battle that goes horribly astray, but not for the reasons you might think. Playing together again and banding together against Mr. Wolf, friendship reignites with loads of big fun on the edge of reality.

With shouts to Lalonde for the cool production design, where everyday cast-off object become the stuff of imagination, including red hoodies.

Five childhood friends grow up, lose touch and take a wacky trip out of bounds in the big fun, big-hearted Playday Mayday.

Playday Mayday continues at TPM till Dec 4; check here for show dates/times – please note the 7:30 start time for evening performances. Get your advance tix online at Toronto Sketchfest or Arts Box Office, or call 416-504-7529.

Keep up with all your Uncalled For shenanigans on Twitter and Facebook.

Toronto Fringe: Do you want to believe? Sharp, dark comedy in Bright Lights

 

bright lights 2

Theatre Brouhaha’s production of Kat Sandler’s Bright Lights opened to a sold out house of super enthusiastic folks at the Tarragon Theatre Mainspace late last night.

Written and directed by Sandler, Bright Lights is set in a community centre, where members of the Alien Experience Support Group gather for their regular meeting to share their experiences of alien encounters in a safe, supportive space. The arrival of newcomer Zoe (Heather Marie Annis) shakes the group to its foundations; her abduction memory includes group organizer Ross (Colin Munch) – and his true identity and motive for forming the group come into question.

The action is fast-paced, and the storytelling is equal parts hilariously funny and darkly edgy; collegial turns combative as the heat gets turned up. Sandler’s outstanding cast is laser-focused and mercurial, weaving tight comedy with fringe society paranoia – and features the creative forces behind Punch Up, Morro and Jasp, Peter n’ Chris and Shakey-Shake & Friends.

Amy Lee is delightfully kooky as the group’s snack baking den mother Laurel; earthy and nurturing, she’s pregnant by a man who isn’t her husband and describes her abduction in terms of a classic rock song. As Zoe, Annis brings a bright-eyed sense of curiosity and tightly wound nerves as she steps into this strange world of those who believe. Peter Carlone is hilariously paranoid as Dave, who’s turned survivalist after suffering multiple probings, a family tradition; dressed in militia gear, he carries a duffle bag of weapons at all times – just in case. Equally hilarious is Chris Wilson’s Wayne; a former child actor who starred in a legal procedural TV show, he fancies himself a legal expert and claims to have been gifted psychic powers during his abduction experience. (Carlone and Wilson are also performing Peter vs. Chris at this year’s Toronto Fringe). Munch gives Ross an affable, welcoming vibe and keeps us guessing as he reacts to the group’s accusations against Ross’s humanity and intentions; Ross has definitely been hiding something.

The only thing for certain is that the dynamic of this group is permanently altered during this meeting – with suspicions, theories and alliances unfolding in unexpected ways. And, in the end, you’re asking yourself: What and who do you believe?

Do you want to believe? Alien abduction, conspiracy theory and suspicion in sharp, darkly funny Bright Lights.

Bright Lights continues at the Tarragon Mainspace until July 9; advance booking for this one is strongly recommended. For ticket info and advance tickets/passes, check out the Fringe website.

Otherworldly, funny, poetic rock & roll fairytale – Trout Stanley

TroutStanleyPoster CRT WEBSm
Poster design by Meags Fitzgerald

Last night, it was out to the Storefront Theatre for Severely Jazzed Productions’ Trout Stanley, written by Claudia Dey, directed by Daniel Pagett.

With the help of the Storyteller (Dan Jeannotte), we learn that Ducharme twins Grace (Tess Degenstein) and Sugar (Hannah Spear) were orphaned as young adults and live an isolated life on the outskirts of a mining town. Sugar has been unable to leave the house since their parents died and, having built a world of their own, the two have created an unusual dynamic, with Grace in the traditional husband role and working at the town dump and Sugar being the stay-at-home ‘wife.’ Their daily domestic routine is turned upside down and sideways when Trout Stanley (Colin Munch) arrives on their birthday, lost and in search of closure as he travels to see where his parents died. Everyone has a secret.
The language of the piece is party poetry, part soap opera, part bedtime story – all with an undercurrent of rock and roll. The world is both harsh and beautiful – and in some cases, it all depends on how you look at it.

Pagett has an excellent cast for this trip. Spear brings an adorable and poignant combination of wide-eyed and haunted, yet optimistic and day dreamy child to the fragile, introverted Sugar; shy and reserved, and so full of longing for she doesn’t even know what, but overshadowed by Grace’s reputation as ‘the pretty one.’ Degenstein’s Grace is a ballsy extroverted rockabilly pin-up girl – and knows it – but beneath the vain exterior is a good, strong heart willing to go to any lengths to protect her sister. Munch gives Trout an edgy lost boy quality, tempered with a sharp wit, poetic soul and an aura of mystery. Like the sisters, Trout has suffered family tragedy and, while he is very likeable and claims to be unable to lie, he is hiding something. As the Storyteller, Jeannotte is a wry-witted, charismatic narrator, ushering – even directing – the scenes and joining in at times on the dialogue. He tells us the story of Trout Stanley with a twinkle in his eye, but with a commitment to the action that goes beyond a generic storyteller.

There’s some highly entertaining and effective staging afoot. Highlights include the sisters’ and Trout’s dance break to Heart’s “Magic Man” near the top of the show is both impressive and funny, especially Trout’s perfect execution of the classic David Caruso CSI Miami sunglasses flourish. The playful, cartoon-like quality of Trout’s late night visit to the twins’ house, sneaking in under cover of darkness to steal food and drink. During intermission, the Storyteller remains seated at his desk, wearing a cone-shaped party hat and flanked by a red balloon while he has a snack and reads a paperback. And who wouldn’t want to have a rock guitar exclamation every time you entered a room, just like Grace.

With shouts to the design team: Hanna Puley (set/costumes), Melissa Joakim (lighting) and Daniel Maslany (sound). The white set and props – particularly the shelves of Sugar’s figurine creations – and the slender birch trees on either side, coupled with lighting effects, give the space an ethereal, almost weightless quality. The wooden desk and chair, which is the Storyteller’s space, is like a link from our world to the world of the twins – and the Storyteller is our guide. The poppy, soft techno pre-show soundtrack, followed by rock riffs and remixed Heart tracks during the course of the action serve as sonic echoes of this world’s beauty and brutality.

Trout Stanley is an otherworldly, funny, poetic and moving rock and roll fairytale featuring a stand-out cast. Get yourselves out to see this.

Trout Stanley continues at the Storefront Theatre until June 6; you can get advance tix online here.

You can follow Severely Jazzed on Facebook and Twitter. In the meantime, check out the show trailer:

Toronto Fringe: A big gooey fun love letter to T.O. in Bad Dog Theatre’s Toronto, I Love You

torontoiloveyou1More comedy fun last night at Bad Dog Theatre Company’s Toronto, I Love You – directed by Julie Dumais Osborne and now playing at the Helen Gardiner Phelan Playhouse during Toronto Fringe.

Live and unscripted, the Bad Dog Repertory Players treat the audience to a night of improv, based on audience input. Last night, we were asked to give them a location in the city – a special, perhaps secret, place that we love and feel good in. From the audience: the bat cave at the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) – and it was both funny and surprising that, while most of the audience had been there, a majority of the players had not. From the players: the annual Sorauren Park Pumpkin Parade and actor Jess Bryson’s backyard patio in Parkdale.

Off they went and created a series of interwoven scenes: an earnest young man’s love of the ROM turns critical when he is forced to make a difficult personal choice that would mean saving it from destruction; a woman who is extremely attached to her carved pumpkin finds herself attracted to a friendly neighbour and struggles to love a human being; and a Parkdale neighbourhood feud between ex-in-laws blossoms into attraction between the siblings of the divorced couple.

It was an awesome fun time!

Shouts to the players: Craig Anderson, Jess Bryson, Nick Di Gaetano, Kyle Dooley, Colin Munch (also appearing in Punch Up), Etan Muskat, Paloma Nunez, Evany Rosen, Hannah Spear, Sean Tabares and Anders Yates.

Toronto, I Love You is a big, fun gooey love letter to T.O.

The show continues at the Helen Gardiner until July 13 – check here for exact dates/times. Advance tix or lining up early highly recommended for this one too.

FYI: August 11-16, Bad Dog Theatre Company will be celebrating the opening week of its new space at Bloor/Ossington (875 Bloor St. West, above the post office). Go check these guys out – they do nightly shows, as well as classes.

Toronto Fringe: Punch drunk with laughter in Theatre Brouhaha’s Punch Up

_r1a6215Kat Sandler and Theatre Brouhaha bring it again big time with the dark comedy Punch Up, written and directed by Sandler, playing now at the George Ignatieff Theatre as part of this year’s Toronto Fringe.

Stand-up comic/comedy writer Pat’s (Colin Munch) life is in the toilet, his wife/comedy team partner has left him and is now starring on a hit TV show using their material – which he wrote! And his stand-up act sucks. Then, he gets kidnapped by lonely guy Duncan (Tim Walker), who needs Pat to teach him how to be funny so he can win the love of the saddest girl in the world, Brenda (Caitlin Driscoll).

Playing the edge between tragedy and comedy, the Punch Up cast is so much awesome. Munch does a hilarious job with Pat’s stand-up meltdown, his comic rant turning to rage, revealing a man who’s hit rock bottom, his feral energy refocusing to solving Duncan’s problem to gain his freedom calmed as he’s literally chained to a typewriter. Walker’s Duncan is a loveable nerd, full of child-like naiveté, wide-eyed and willing to go to extreme lengths for a woman he’s just met and fallen in love at first sight with. (And, having recently finished a run of Kate and Sam Are Not Breaking Up with Cue6, Walker has become the go-to choice if your show needs a sweet nerd who kidnaps a celebrity for a good cause.) As Brenda, Driscoll is adorably troubled, afraid to love but longing too – her sharp humour softened by a glimmer of optimism when she accepts Duncan’s dinner invitation.

With shouts to the fun set design of Duncan’s place – aka “Pee Wee’s murder basement.”

So. Much. Funny! And some sad. Punch Up kills.

Punch Up continues its run at the George Ignatieff Theatre until July 13 – check here for exact dates/times. Strongly suggest advance tix on this one – this is a very popular company and the place was packed yesterday afternoon.