Secrets & dark suspicions in the eerie, Gothic family drama Gripless

GriplessCastBWStanding: David Huband & Amber Mackereth. Seated: Margaret Lamarre.

 

Green Garden Equity Artist Collective gives us a disturbing tale of family secrets and dark suspicions in Deborah Ann Frankel’s eerie family drama Gripless; directed by Frankel and on now for a short run at Red Sandcastle Theatre.

On a stormy night in a small town, brother Ben (David Huband) and sister April (Amber Mackereth) bring their mother Elaine (Margaret Lamarre) home from a birthday celebration dinner in honour of their deceased father Daniel. Uncomfortable and anxious to leave, intimidating younger sister April appears to be the alpha to her more easy going older brother. But try as they might to leave their family home, something Elaine says keeps drawing them away from the door and back into the living room.

As the action unfolds, we learn that Elaine remarried about a year after Daniel’s death; an abusive brute of a man named Tim, who recently had a stroke. We get the sense that there are some uncomfortable unsaid truths in the closet of this family’s history; and memories shift from nostalgic reverie and childhood shenanigans to disturbing discoveries and suspicions—hinting at a troubling and violent dynamic.

Compelling work from the cast in this unsettling, spooky story of family dysfunction and conflicting perspectives. Lamarre’s Elaine is damaged, adrift and also manipulative; poignant yet unsettling, Elaine’s selective memory targets only the happy moments and she seems oddly disconnected from what’s happening right in front of her. As April, Mackereth’s tough-talking, bully exterior masks a deeply hurt, vulnerable child; unforgiving with her mother, April has tender feelings for her big brother, the only one who’s ever been on her side. Huband’s Ben is the perfect foil for Mackereth’s April; wry-witted, quiet and introspective, Ben is clearly the peacemaker in the family—but even his easy-going demeanour gives way to moments of haunted reflection.

Writer/director Frankel, who folks will recognize as Red Sandcastle’s intrepid SM, will be taking over as General Manager when AD Rosemary Doyle heads to Kingston in August as the new AD of Theatre Kingston; multitasking in this production, she’s also juggling box office and SM duty in booth—and created one heck of a dark, atmospheric set and soundtrack.

Gripless has two more performances at Red Sandcastle Theatre: tonight (July 22) and tomorrow (July 23) at 8 p.m.; book tickets in advance at deborahannfrankel@gmail.com or pay cash at the door.

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Noel Coward classic gets digital age makeover – & a dog – in Red Sandcastle Theatre’s delightful iBlithe

© Burke Campbell 002
David Huband, Margaret Lamarre, Maria Syrgiannis, Robert Keller & Adrian Proszowski – photo by Burke Campbell

A Noel Coward favourite is getting a modern-day, multimedia twist for the iPhone age at Red Sandcastle Theatre in Rosemary Doyle’s iBlithe, directed by David Huband. The opening got bumped to last night after one of the actors got a gig on Thursday, resulting in an additional show being added on Wed, Mar 31.

A few changes from Blithe Spirit: iBlithe’s running time is shorter, the Bradmans are now a gay couple, and Edith the maid is now Edith the dog. The record player becomes an iPhone, and projection is used to great effect for the emergence of otherworldly visitation.

When Charles (Huband) and Ruth (Maria Syrgiannis) Condomine invite psychic Mme. Arcati (Margaret Lamarre) to their country home for a séance, only their friends Dr. George (Adrian Proszowski) and Victor (Robert Keller) Bradman know that Charles is out to get some background research on a book he’s working on – he’s not a true believer in the occult. And the resulting appearance of the ghost of his first wife Elvira (Doyle) gives Charles way more than he bargained for.

The cast takes us on a wacky, hilariously funny trip of British manners, Coward wit and supernatural shenanigans – and the packed house loved it! Huband’s multilayered performance of Charles finds all the sweet spots; a likeable if not somewhat smug, henpecked husband, his witty life of contentment and country home insulation is turned topsy-turvy when he finds himself living with two wives – and his conflicted loyalties and emotions show. Syrgiannis brings a lovely, sharp-witted edge to Ruth, a feisty force to be reckoned with that turns jealous and desperate at Elvira’s appearance – and she finds herself at wit’s end as a result. Lamarre is spellbinding as the eccentric Arcati; a deeply committed, if not batty, medium who finds herself torn between the seriousness of the Condomines’ situation and sheer delight at the thrill of a complex and challenging case. Doyle is a bratty treat as Elvira; playfully coquettish and frolicking in the grey area of moral hygiene, there’s a spoiled child beneath that slinky exterior – and she’s got more on that ghostly mind than one might think. The Bradmans are an adorable, sophisticated couple: Proszowski’s Dr. George is an affable and sympathetic, with a dry wit and an efficient, take charge manner; and Keller brings a charming, indiscreet and irreverent air of humour to the slapdash Robert. And Edith may be a stuffed terrier, but she is abarkably sweet.

Deborah Frankel photo, iBlithe
Margaret Lamarre & Rosemary Doyle – photo by Deborah Ann Framkel

With big shouts to spooktacular stage manager Deborah Ann Frankel for all the multitasking, including running sound and lighting cues, and SFX (with the cast). And the recording used in this modern-day production for the séance scenes is both unique and fabulous.

Noel Coward classic gets a digital age makeover – and a dog – in Red Sandcastle Theatre’s delightful iBlithe.

iBlithe continues at Red Sandcastle today and runs till April 2; check the website for dates, times and ticket info. It’s an intimate space, so advance booking recommended.