The ABCs of cut-throat real estate in the darkly funny, testosterone-fuelled Glengarry Glen Ross

Derek Perks, Chris Coculuzzi & Frank De Francesco in Glengarry Glen Ross—photo by David Fitzpatrick

 

Amicus Productions wraps its 2016-17 season with its production of David Mamet’s Glengarry Glen Ross, directed by Harvey Levkoe; and opening last night at the Papermill Theatre at Todmorden Mills.

Set in Chicago in the 1980s, Glengarry Glen Ross still resonates today with its condemnation of American business and the testosterone-filled culture that runs it. In a world where you eat what you kill, men are driven to desperate measures to survive, and thrive in a twisted hierarchy of “real men” and competition for big-ticket prizes.

The story opens at the local Chinese restaurant, where we get a lay of the land and a taste of its inhabitants. Veteran salesman Shelly “The Machine” Levine (Daryn DeWalt) has been in a serious slump and makes a desperate plea to office manager John Williamson (Chris Coculuzzi) to get some prime leads. The outraged Dave Moss (Neil Hicks) vents to his side-kick co-worker George Aaronow (Jerrold Karch), hatching a plan to take the good leads by force and put them to use for their own benefit. And the slick Richard Roma (Derek Perks) spots a mark in the shy, unassuming James Lingk (Abbas Hussain).

With Act Two opening on their pillaged office, Detective Baylen (Frank De Francesco) has taken up residence, interviewing each man one by one. Shelly seems to have emerged from his slump – and big time. And Roma is celebrating record sales, earning him a car. That all changes when a sheepish James arrives, putting that deal in jeopardy. Loyalties are tested and stand-offs get ferocious as things go to hell, and we get closer to discovering who broke in and stole the leads.

Nice work from the entire cast in this intense, hot-tempered and darkly funny Mamet classic. Stand-outs include DeWalt, who finds a great balance between flop-sweat desperation and cocky showmanship as Shelly Levine; it’s a roller coaster of extreme highs and lows as Shelly fights for his livelihood, vacillating between winning and losing. Perks is a charming scoundrel as Roma; a suave and seductive player, and a sharp marksman, Roma is nevertheless a thoughtful philosopher and a loyal guy—crediting Levine as his mentor. Just don’t get on his bad side.

DFM Services - Amicus Productions - 2016~2017 ~ Glengary Glenross - Dress Rehearsal - 0041 (DAF20544)
Neil Hicks, Daryn DeWalt & Derek Perks in Glengarry Glen Ross—photo by David Fitzpatrick

Coculuzzi gives us an icy, detached Williamson, who’s a bit of a cypher; the company ‘Yes man,’ Williamson’s a classic case of management who knows zero about the work he’s managing—and who deeply enjoys the withholding and proffering of power. And Karch gives a compellingly understated and comic performance as George Aaronow; a quiet, sweet guy, Aaronow may have been duped by Moss, but he knows how to look after himself.

Lie, cheat, steal. The ABCs of cut-throat real estate in the darkly funny, testosterone-fuelled Glengarry Glen Ross.

Glengarry Glen Ross continues at the Papermill Theatre until May 6; check here for ticket purchase/info or call 416-860-6176.

You can keep up with Amicus Productions on Twitter and Facebook.

Secrets, schemes & stamps in sharp & darkly funny Mauritius

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Derek Perks (foreground), with Douglas Tindal & Rebecca De La Cour in Mauritius – photo by Bill Michelson

Sometimes a stamp isn’t just a stamp.

A pair of rare postage stamps becomes a catalyst for hopes, dreams and desires in The Village Players’ production of Theresa Rebeck’s Mauritius, directed by Michael Hiller, which opened at the Village Playhouse last night.

Estranged step-sisters Jackie (Rebecca De La Cour) and Mary (Tina McCulloch) are reunited following the death of their mother, and discover Mary’s grandfather’s stamp collection as they sort through their mother’s things. The two have very different perspectives of both the stamps’ ownership and destiny. When Rebecca’s attempt to get the stamps appraised is rebuffed by the owner/operator of Phil’s stamp shop (Douglas Tindal), Phil’s friend Dennis (Derek Perks) comes to her assistance. He finds the collection extremely interesting – interesting enough to contact the wealthy and shady Sterling (Robert Woodcock), an extreme stamp aficionado, to broker a deal.

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Derek Perks & Robert Woodcock – photo by Bill Michelson

The Mauritius script has a Walker meets Mamet flavour – and the cast does an effing nice job of it. Tindal is dishevelled and Sphinx-like as stamp expert Phil; his shop, like its owner, is frozen in time (somewhere around the 70s) and understated in its seediness (set by Nadia Dziubaniwsky). Perks is delightfully wiry and wily as the fast-talking, likeable scoundrel Dennis; a smooth operator, and adept at sizing up people and situations, there’s more to Dennis than meets the eye. De La Cour’s Jackie is a tough cookie; assertive and brave, yet full of hurt and longing – and grasping at hope – under that brash exterior. Woodcock is a remarkable presence as Sterling; physically, psychologically and intellectually menacing, with a soft underbelly invoked by the stamps, his object of obsession and desire. And McCulloch brings some nice, complex layers of propriety, nostalgia and fierceness to Mary, who is deeply conflicted within her family dynamic and personal attachment to her grandfather’s stamp collection.

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Tina McCulloch & Rebecca De La Cour – photo by Bill Michelson

Each character’s response to the stamps reveals what he/she values: money, freedom, history, possession and legacy.

Secrets, schemes and stamps in The Village Players’ sharp and darkly funny Mauritius.

Mauritius continues at the Village until Jan 30; show dates/times and ticket info here. You can keep up with the Village Players’ goings-on on Twitter and Facebook.

Amicus Productions’ Cyrano De Bergerac a highly entertaining & moving adventure in wit, swordplay & love

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Valvert (Scott Simpson) challenges Cyrano (Chris Coculuzzi) to a duel.

Spent a highly entertaining afternoon at The Papermill Theatre (Todmorden Mills, 67 Pottery Rd.) yesterday, with Amicus Productions’ performance of Cyrano De Bergerac, written by Edmond Rostand, adapted by Chris Coculuzzi and Roxanne Deans, and directed by Mary Dwyer (Toronto Fringe fans may have seen their marvelous 80-minute memory play version of Cyrano, performed outdoors at the 2004 fest).

Amicus does a really nice job with this classic tale of the mercurial poet, philosopher and swordsman, whose unusually long nose is a distinct social liability among those who are unwilling or unable to look past it. This new, full-length version is a more linear piece of storytelling, hearkens back to Coculuzzi and Deans’ original script, based on the translations of Gladys Thomas, Mary F. Guillemard and Howard Thayer Kingsbury.

Excellent work from the cast, including several multi-tasking supporting players. Coculuzzi does a remarkable job in the title role, bringing a lively yet grounded combination of wit, grace and spleen to a man who, despite his rough edges and brash behaviour, is possessing of a vulnerable heart and a romantic soul. Celeste Van Vroenhoven gives us a nicely layered Roxane, sweet and loyal, also a romantic at heart, and naive at first about love and human behaviour – but unlike both Cyrano and Christian, fearless in the face of love. Paul Cotton does a nice job as Roxane’s earnest admirer Christian, hot and youthful in love – shallow, but not ill-meaning. The triangle here is a lovely illustration of superficial and deep love, both of which can be communicated via poetry and sweet words.

Derek Perks is deliciously diabolical as the smirking and snake-like De Guiche, the noble vying for Roxane’s affections – and not above playing dirty to win her. And Stephen Flett is a delight as the ebullient Ragueneau, the chef with the heart of a poet. And big shouts to Roxanne Deans for stepping in at the top of the show to stand in as Le Bret, when actor Henrik Thessen got stuck in traffic on the way to the theatre.

The design team did a marvelous job, producing a beautifully minimalist set – both practical and aesthetically pleasing – as well as assembling striking costume and evocative music of the period: Arash Eshghpour (set), David Buffham (lighting), Farnoosh Talebpour (costume) and Dave Fitzpatrick (sound). With kudos to Naomi Priddle Hunter for choreographing the exciting and fun sword fights.

Amicus Productions’ Cyrano De Bergerac is a highly entertaining and moving adventure in wit, swordplay and love. This is some big fun for all ages – so get yourselves over to the Papermill Theatre to see this.

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Cyrano (Chris Coculuzzi) prompts Christian (Paul Cotton) as he woos Roxane (Celeste Van Vroenhoven)

Cyrano De Bergerac runs at the Papermill Theatre until November 22. You can get advance tickets online or by phone: 416-860-6176.

Chillingly fascinating journey into man’s dark side – Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde

Last night, I headed to the Papermill Theatre to see Amicus Productions’ Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, adapted from the Robert Louis Stevenson novella by Jeffrey Hatcher and directed by Harvey Levkoe. Not to be confused with the musical version that has also been playing in Toronto recently.

Dr. Jekyll (Christopher Irving) is man driven to find a way through that door of the mind that leads to man’s baser, primal nature – the dark side of his personality – to study it in order to ultimately control it. What he doesn’t count on is his own dark side becoming physically manifest, to the point that a very different man emerges, bursting forth and wrecking havoc in the city, engaging in every form of debauchery – even to the point of torturing, maiming and murdering. And even when Jekyll realizes what is happening, he is somehow able to dissociate those evil actions – they were done by someone else: Mr. Hyde (played by a mini-ensemble of four multi-tasking actors: Chris Coculuzzi, Stephen Flett, Derek Perks and Jenn Sellers). As we are warned during a medical school lecture: Just because you can do something doesn’t mean you should. Of course, it all ends very badly for the “good” doctor.

Wayne Cardinalli’s minimalist set design is incredibly effective. The central set piece, the rotating door – red on the side facing the street and steel blue grey on the inside – is a perfect realization of that door into the mind that Jekyll is so keen to unlock. Another key piece is a wooden table on castors: an examining table, displaying corpses for medical students in one scene, later becoming the bed at the hotel Jekyll checks into and where he meets Elizabeth (Stephanie Barone), the woman Hyde loves. Orderlies/servants played by assistant stage managers Kristin Myers and Jamie Zhuravel, along with the cast, shift the set pieces and furniture, changing the scenes with choreographed precision.

The use of four Hydes is particularly interesting – and the four actors, including one woman, each bring different colours to the character. Coculuzzi, the Hyde who falls in love with Elizabeth, is a wounded animal, instinct pushing him to lash out, but finding peace and calm in a woman’s love. Flett is menacing as the rough and course Hyde, while Perks finds his diabolical side and Sellers the smooth, charming tones. And Irving gets a chance to find the savagery in Jekyll, as the lines between him and Hyde blur near the end of the play and he can no longer distinguish between his “good” and “bad” self.

Levkoe has an excellent cast to take us on this trip, which also features Coculuzzi’s daughter Cabiria Aquarius as the Little Girl. Barone is brave and tender as Elizabeth, seeing beyond the surface of Hyde’s brutality into his pain, as well as Jekyll’s torment. Coculuzzi (also Dr. H.K. Lanyon) and Flett (as lawyer Gabriel Utterson) do a nice job of switching back and forth from their respective Hydes to supportive friends of Jekyll. Perks and Sellers do a great job of juggling mini-casts of their own, with Sellers playing male and female characters, including Jekyll’s servant Poole and one of the Hydes, and Perks shifting from arrogant surgeon Sir Danvers Carew to a wry-witted private investigator and Hyde, among others.

Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde is a chilling, compelling – at times darkly funny – journey into the dark side of the mind. As bad as you know it’s going to get, you can’t help but be fascinated by this story. And the four Hydes on the stage, shifting in and out from other characters, remind us of the potential for cruelty that lies within all of us.

You have a few more chances to see this – it runs until this Saturday (November 24), with matinée and evening performances on Saturday. Click here for more info: http://www.amicusproductions.ca/current_season.php#jekyll