Reclamation & salvation—stories of Black women’s lives told with candor, sass & humour in powerful, theatrical for colored girls

Karen Glave, d’bi.young anitafrika, Ordena Stephens-Thompson, Akosua Amo-Adem, Evangelia Kambites, Tamara Brown & SATE in for colored girls—photo by Cylla von Tiedemann

 

Soulpepper opened its production of Ntozake Shange’s for colored girls who have committed suicide / when the rainbow is enuf, directed by Djanet Sears with assistance from Mumbi Tindyebwa Otu, to a packed house and a triple curtain call standing ovation at the Young Centre last night.

From the innocent, playful childhood world of hopscotch and double dutch in the playground, to sexual awakening and the discovery of sensual power in young adulthood, to the harsh realities and challenges of life as a Black woman, for colored girls is poetry and politics in motion. Incorporating spoken word, a cappella vocals, dance and storytelling, the excellent ensemble creates scenes, moments and soundscapes. The result is startling, theatrical, hilarious and heartbreaking.

Kudos to the ensemble: Akosua Amo-Adem, d’bi.young anitafrika, Tamara Brown, Karen Glave, Evangelia Kambites, SATE and Ordena Stephens-Thompson. With choreography by Jasmyn Fyffe and Vivine Scarlett, and music composition and arrangement by Suba Sankaran, the cast deftly weaves the stories of these women with honesty, courage and emotional impact—commanding the stage as they engage, entertain and wake us.

Brown’s opening dance is magical and elemental. Glave takes us back to the excitement and anticipation of graduation day with a tale of young love in the back seat. SATE takes charge and takes us out dancing; a woman enjoying the music and the power of her own body in motion. Stephens-Thompson regales us with a poetic, sensual account of woman (Kambites) who attracts with the mystery and allure of an Egyptian goddess. Amo-Adem takes us to church with a proclamation of what belongs to her, coupled with an order to get back what’s been stolen. And anitafrika breaks our hearts as a mother struggling to protect her children.

Highlighting the lived experiences of public and private selves—the public strength and confidence that protect the private vulnerability and fear—from hope and joy to loss and despair, for colored girls is a celebration of Black women finding their voices.

Reclamation and salvation—stories of Black women’s lives told with candor, sass and humour in the powerful, theatrical for colored girls.

for colored girls continues in the Baillie Theatre at the Young Centre; get your advance tix online or by calling the box office at 416-866-8666.

In the meantime, check out the for colored girls teaser:

 

SummerWorks: A young Ghanaian girl’s magical world of stories & dreams of life in America in charming, moving Osia

Osia-400x330
Artwork by Zoya Taylor

Emerging playwright Jijo Quayson and director Brad Fraser premiere Quayson’s first play Osia, running in the Factory Theatre Mainspace for SummerWorks, with Fraser’s direction assisted by Spencer Schunk, and dramaturgical support from Djanet Sears, Fraser and Andrea Donaldson.

Set in present-day Ghana, Harmosia (Nicole Nwokolo) and her Mama (Chemika Bennett-Heath) eagerly anticipate the return of Mama’s brother Uncle (Paul Ohonsi), who has moved to America and promised to take them to live with him there. As Harmosia delights in life at school and stories of a magical princess who lives by the river, she dreams of being a princess herself, convinced that her father was a king. Mama dreams of a better life in America, leaving her housekeeping job behind to study to become a nurse. Uncle has big plans, and has enlisted Kwefi (Roshawn Balgrove), a family friend who runs the local shop, to help him make some big money. Meanwhile, Mama’s friend and neighbour Bernice (Chiamaka G. Ugwu) has her sights set on the newly returned Uncle. Beneath all the dreaming and planning, harsh realities are revealed.

Really nice work from the cast with the storytelling. Nwokolo is both delightful and poignant as the little girl Harmosia; fiercely active, with a vast and wonderful imagination, she is a true innocent – all that will change with experience. Bennett-Heath brings a lovely sense of conflict to Mama; longing for something better for herself and her daughter, she is dependent on her brother, both financially and emotionally; and she can’t help but wonder what he’s up to. Ohonsi is charming and generous as the fast-talking Uncle; his jovial manner concealing a nastier purpose. Taking care of business in both his new and former home; his big schemes are risky – legally and personally. Balgrove’s Kwefi is a genuine bright light of welcome and friendship; but even Kwefi’s sense of loyalty can be pushed too far when he sees what Uncle’s about. Ugwu is hilarious as the bubbly neighbourhood gossip Bernice; a devout Christian who leads the community bible studies, her hypocrisy shows as she lusts after Uncle.

Family secrets emerge and dreams become threatened in a story that – rightfully noted by Quayson in the program – could happen anywhere.

A young Ghanaian girl’s magical world of stories and dreams of life in America in charming, moving Osia.

Osia continues at the Factory Theatre Mainspace until Aug 14. Follow the production on Facebook.