The ABCs of cut-throat real estate in the darkly funny, testosterone-fuelled Glengarry Glen Ross

Derek Perks, Chris Coculuzzi & Frank De Francesco in Glengarry Glen Ross—photo by David Fitzpatrick

 

Amicus Productions wraps its 2016-17 season with its production of David Mamet’s Glengarry Glen Ross, directed by Harvey Levkoe; and opening last night at the Papermill Theatre at Todmorden Mills.

Set in Chicago in the 1980s, Glengarry Glen Ross still resonates today with its condemnation of American business and the testosterone-filled culture that runs it. In a world where you eat what you kill, men are driven to desperate measures to survive, and thrive in a twisted hierarchy of “real men” and competition for big-ticket prizes.

The story opens at the local Chinese restaurant, where we get a lay of the land and a taste of its inhabitants. Veteran salesman Shelly “The Machine” Levine (Daryn DeWalt) has been in a serious slump and makes a desperate plea to office manager John Williamson (Chris Coculuzzi) to get some prime leads. The outraged Dave Moss (Neil Hicks) vents to his side-kick co-worker George Aaronow (Jerrold Karch), hatching a plan to take the good leads by force and put them to use for their own benefit. And the slick Richard Roma (Derek Perks) spots a mark in the shy, unassuming James Lingk (Abbas Hussain).

With Act Two opening on their pillaged office, Detective Baylen (Frank De Francesco) has taken up residence, interviewing each man one by one. Shelly seems to have emerged from his slump – and big time. And Roma is celebrating record sales, earning him a car. That all changes when a sheepish James arrives, putting that deal in jeopardy. Loyalties are tested and stand-offs get ferocious as things go to hell, and we get closer to discovering who broke in and stole the leads.

Nice work from the entire cast in this intense, hot-tempered and darkly funny Mamet classic. Stand-outs include DeWalt, who finds a great balance between flop-sweat desperation and cocky showmanship as Shelly Levine; it’s a roller coaster of extreme highs and lows as Shelly fights for his livelihood, vacillating between winning and losing. Perks is a charming scoundrel as Roma; a suave and seductive player, and a sharp marksman, Roma is nevertheless a thoughtful philosopher and a loyal guy—crediting Levine as his mentor. Just don’t get on his bad side.

DFM Services - Amicus Productions - 2016~2017 ~ Glengary Glenross - Dress Rehearsal - 0041 (DAF20544)
Neil Hicks, Daryn DeWalt & Derek Perks in Glengarry Glen Ross—photo by David Fitzpatrick

Coculuzzi gives us an icy, detached Williamson, who’s a bit of a cypher; the company ‘Yes man,’ Williamson’s a classic case of management who knows zero about the work he’s managing—and who deeply enjoys the withholding and proffering of power. And Karch gives a compellingly understated and comic performance as George Aaronow; a quiet, sweet guy, Aaronow may have been duped by Moss, but he knows how to look after himself.

Lie, cheat, steal. The ABCs of cut-throat real estate in the darkly funny, testosterone-fuelled Glengarry Glen Ross.

Glengarry Glen Ross continues at the Papermill Theatre until May 6; check here for ticket purchase/info or call 416-860-6176.

You can keep up with Amicus Productions on Twitter and Facebook.

Fear & loathing in real estate with a damn fine all-female cast in Jet Girls Productions’ Glengarry Glen Ross

GlengarryPosterOnline-1 - smallAnd the Mametpalooza continues over at Red Sandcastle Theatre. (I saw Headstrong Collective’s marvelous production of Boston Marriage at Campbell House Museum last Saturday.) This time, it’s Jet Girls Productions’ ballsy all-female production of David Mamet’s Glengarry Glen Ross, directed by Anita La Selva.

With this world premiere of the gender switched Glengarry Glen Ross, Jet Girls has a very ambitious first production on their hands – and they weren’t permitted to change a word of the script. The result is powerful, thought-provoking, darkly funny and more than a bit jarring.

Joining director La Selva on this journey is a fine ensemble of local female actors (in order of appearance): Elizabeth Saunders (Shelly Levene), Julie Brar (John Williamson and co-founder of Jet Girls), Françoise Balthazar (David Moss), Laurel Paetz (George Aaronow), Marianne Sawchuk (Richard Roma and co-founder of Jet Girls), Rosemary Doyle (James Lingk and A.D. of Red Sandcastle Theatre) and Robinne Fanfair (Detective Baylen).

With none of the text altered – including character names – and the men replaced with women, the raw and often brutal language of the play comes across as all the more harsh. Violent verbal exchanges highlighted with name-calling and profanity hit harder coming from the mouths of women, but at the same time there is an unsettling naturalism about it. These are women struggling for survival in a merciless, dog eat dog business driven by the mantra “Always Be Closing.” You don’t close, you don’t eat. Slogging through lists of dead leads in hard, changing economic times, the futility and desperation is palpable. Make no mistake, this is no mere cat fight – competition is fierce and it’s the law of the jungle here.

As Shelly “The Machine” Levene, Saunders gives us a compelling and poignant portrait of a salesperson past her prime, an old-school practitioner struggling along the rat race, ravenously desperate to break a losing streak, and avoid falling into despair. Brar does a lovely job with the aloof, pompous young pup Williamson, revealing hints of ruthlessness and entitlement beneath the cool professional exterior. Balthazar gives a riveting performance as Moss; by turns a rampaging bear and snake-like manipulator, there is something of the ticking time bomb in her. Paetz gives nice layers to Aaronow, Moss’s sidekick; mousey in her righteous indignation over the poor state of their leads, and an easy mark for Moss’s machinations – but this mouse wants to roar when she’s backed into a corner. Sawchuk mesmerizes as the slick operator Roma. All sex and charisma, smooth and sharp and the same time, she is a master of language, flirtation and flattery – anything to get what she wants. As Roma’s mark Lingk, Doyle brings a lovely combination of frumpy, gullible naiveté and a devil may care yearning for adventure to this sexually repressed, hen-pecked woman – but is not beyond standing her ground, albeit on shaky legs, when her place in the world becomes threatened. Very nice work from Fanfair as the no-nonsense, unflappable Detective Baylen; while professional in demeanour, she will brook no shenanigans from this group of real estate hustlers during her investigation.

With shouts to costume designer Jan Venus for the sharp, evocative 80s wardrobe.

Fear and loathing in real estate with a damn fine all-lady cast in Jet Girls Productions’ Glengarry Glen Ross. Get yourself out to Red Sandcastle Theatre to see this.

Glengarry Glen Ross runs at Red Sandcastle until April 26. For advance tix, call 416-845-9411 or email redsandcastletheatre@gmail.com

Razor sharp, mercurial wit as two women spar around their love in Boston Marriage

Boston Marriage
Deborah Drakeford, Catherine McNally & that infamous necklace in Boston Marriage – photo by Bonnie Anderson

There’s a wee Mametpalooza happening in Toronto right now, with two exciting productions of David Mamet plays, featuring some fine local female actors: Headstrong Collective’s Boston Marriage at Campbell House Museum and an all-female cast in Glengarry Glen Ross at Red Sandcastle Theatre. I saw Headstrong’s Boston Marriage, directed by Kelli Fox, last night.

Intimately staged in the parlour on the main floor of Campbell House Museum, the audience is seated along two walls, giving us a fly on the wall view of the proceedings.
This is an unusual play for Mamet: for its all-female cast and period setting. This is Mamet meets the Victorians – and the result is an interesting, if not anachronistic, piece of theatre featuring brilliant, almost Cowardesque, dialogue. At times the language of the drawing room, then lyrical or profane – it is fast-paced, unapologetic, erotic and even harsh on occasion.

Two particular friends reunite after being apart for some time. Anna (Catherine McNally) receives Claire (Deborah Drakeford) into her home, a home that is subsidized by Anna’s “protector,” a married man who’s taken her as his mistress. Claire has a favour to ask: she needs a place in which to have a private liaison with a younger love interest. The discussion that follows is less about the tenancy agreement and more about their relationship.

And then there’s that necklace. Sometimes, a gorgeous necklace can be way more trouble than it’s worth. Anna’s protector has gifted her a lovely emerald necklace, and this decision sets off a series of misadventure that pulls the women’s focus from their current desires and into damage control.

Throughout the exchanges of acerbic wit and lightning fast rapport, there is a poignant underpinning of desperation and loneliness as we watch Anna and Claire get reacquainted. Opposites in many ways, but so alike as they both struggle, as unmarried women, to survive – all the while fearing that their best years are behind them. Like Dorothy at the beginning of The Wizard of Oz, grasping for a true happiness that they believe lies beyond their own backyard. And while Anna’s young maid Catherine (Charlotte Dennis) is of the servant class, they can’t help but envy her youth – now in the first blossom of love and lust – and the fact that she has her whole life ahead of her even as a good portion of theirs is in the past.

Brought into the production by actors McNally and Drakeford, Fox is a thoroughly good match for this play and this cast. You can read Fox’s thoughts about Mamet and Boston Marriage in Jon Kaplan’s preview interview for NOW Magazine.

McNally and Drakeford give powerhouse performances, nicely supported by Dennis. McNally’s Anna has a delicious dramatic flair, yet is conventional and pragmatic in her way, deftly aware of the economics of her situation, and deeply hurt by Claire’s revelation of a new, and very young, love. As Claire, Drakeford has a lovely bohemian edge; fiercely independent and sensual, she has the air of an adventuress about her – as well as the hopeless romantic. You can picture Anna and Claire meeting at an art college, dreams of their future together opening up before them as their love grows. But then, paths diverge only to reconnect years later – and with very different lives. Even after their long separation, their conversation is the quixotic shorthand of good friends, slowed down only somewhat by moments of grasping for words, as we gals of a certain age are wont to do. Dennis is a delight as the saucy Scottish maid Catherine; fearless and outspoken in her naiveté, but not as clueless as she sometimes appears. And she gets an earful – and likely an education – with her employer’s goings-on.

It’s razor sharp, mercurial wit tinged with poignancy as two women spar with time and each other as they talk around their love in this marvelous production of Boston Marriage.

Boston Marriage continues at Campbell House until April 26. Seating is limited, so advance booking is strongly recommended. Get yourselves out to Campbell House to see this. You can get tickets online here.

In the meantime, you can check out the interviews with Fox, McNally and Drakeford on Headstrong Collective’s YouTube channel.