The Sad Blisters: Wrap-up

Seated: Bonnie Gray & Esther Thibault. Standing: Cate McKim, Andrea Lyons & Anne McDougall. Set design by Alexis Chubb. Lighting design by Liz Currie. Photo by Victoria Shepherd.

 

And that’s a wrap! The Sad Blisters took its final bow at The Commons Space on Saturday night. Huge thanks to everyone who came out and/or supported us through shout-outs on social media/word of mouth!

This is my favourite photo of the Blister sisters, taken by director Victoria Shepherd to post on National Siblings Day.

Big love and shouts to Debbie Batten and Victoria Shepherd for trusting us with Andrew Batten’s words; to Tina McCulloch for stepping in to multi-task with co-producing, marketing/promo, ticket sales and box office; Liz Currie and Jamie Fairfoull for their work and watchful eyes throughout rehearsals and in the booth; Alexis Chubb, John Stuart Campbell and Livia Pravato for their design excellence; Ryan Armstrong for getting us into fighting form; and to Brent Shepherd and Gord Thibault for helping to put it all together.

And to my Blister sisters Bonnie Gray, Andrea Lyons, Anne McDougall and Esther Thibault — so happy to have had the chance to work with you and get to know you. xo

It was a bittersweet pleasure and an honour to bring Andrew’s story, lovingly based on his beloved Debbie’s family, to life. Blister!

 

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The meaning of life, death & the role of a lifetime in the moving, tender & funny Or Not To Be

Andrew Robinson, Shawn DeSouza-Coelho & Karen Scobie in Or Not To Be—photo by Vic Finucci

 

I was back at Red Sandcastle Theatre last night, this time for Glass Hammer Productions’ presentation of Andrew Batten’s Or Not To Be, directed by Julia Haist. I saw the premiere at Alumnae Theatre’s New Ideas Festival last year and was excited to see the evolution of the piece.

Actor Ben (Shawn DeSouza-Coelho) and director Sebastian (Andrew Robinson), also best friends, are working on putting together a production of Hamlet, with Ben playing the tragic hero. It’s the production of a lifetime—and the role of a lifetime for Ben—in more ways than one. Ben is living with a rare cancer, and his life now revolves around post-op treatments, medical appointments and an uncertain future. Rounding out his support team are his family and partner Sarah (Karen Scobie)—all touched in his or her own way by Ben’s illness.

Beneath the brave face Ben puts on for the world is a deep-seated internal conflict about the project and his treatment. As he struggles with side effects, low energy, frustration, and the fear of forgetting his lines and sucking at the role, he begins to wonder who he’s doing all of this for—and he’s faced with some hard choices, the impact of which will ripple out to those he loves.

Really lovely work and great chemistry from this three-hander cast in this intimate and candid production. DeSouza-Coelho’s Ben is a compelling picture of stoicism and determination, his thousand-mile stare and stillness belying the troubled soul beneath the surface; and he gives us nicely drawn Hamlet in a selection of classic soliloquies. Robinson brings the perfect balance of cockiness and warmth to Sebastian; Ben’s best friend since grade school, his theatrical ambitions are put into perspective by his support and care of Ben. Scobie gives Sarah a poignant sense of vulnerability and conflict as Ben’s lovingly supportive and uncomplaining partner; torn between wanting what’s best for Ben and not wanting to let him go, Sarah must confront her own feelings and motives. These relationship dynamics have all the truth, humour and feeling of people who know each other well—and in Ben and Sebastian’s case, a long time. And while the truth may be hard to take, it’s served up with love and honesty.

In the end, it makes you think. How would you react in Ben’s situation? What would your life be? And, as your life is right now, what’s your Hamlet? We are reminded that time is a precious, non-renewable resource—and despite the best intentions of those we love, it is we who must ultimately decide what path our lives will take.

With shouts to Liz Currie, the intrepid stage manager, lighting designer and tech in the booth; and to Wellspring, an organization—noted in the program—that provides programs and services for people living with cancer and their caregivers.

The meaning of life, death and the role of a lifetime in the moving, tender and funny Or Not To Be.

Or Not To Be continues at Red Sandcastle until January 28, Thursday through Saturday at 8 pm, with 2 pm matinees on Jan 20, 21, 27 and 28. Tickets available by calling the box office at 416 845-9411, or online at this link for first seven shows and this link for the final seven shows.