SummerWorks: Death, fear & loneliness in the spine-tingling, darkly funny, Hitchcockian A Girl Lives Alone

Photo by Molly Flood.

Theatre Mischief gives us a spine-tingling, darkly funny turn—and a unique look at death, loneliness, fear and how people live together—in its SummerWorks production of Jessica Moss’s Hitchcock-inspired murder mystery comedy A Girl Lives Alone. Directed by Moss and the company, the show is currently running in the Theatre Centre’s Franco Boni Theatre.

New to her NYC apartment, Marion (Samantha Madely) returns home one night to find her fellow tenants assembled outside, their building taped off as a crime scene. A young woman in the building was murdered, at home in her apartment, the unknown perpetrator still at large. A murder mystery, Hitchcock fan obsessed with her ex-boyfriend’s classic murder mystery-inspired radio show podcast, Marion becomes hell-bent on investigating her neighbours in hopes of discovering the murderer. Gradually, she gets to know her fellow tenants: the opinionated, judgemental and fastidious Alma (Anita La Selva); the harried landlord Murray (Alexander Thomas); boyfriend/girlfriend pair the volatile Stewart (Aldrin Bundoc) and chatty Kim (Asha Vijayasingham); the nervous, quirky Janet (Jessica Moss); and the creepy, enigmatic Foley Artist upstairs (Andrew Musselman). Watching from the sidelines is the bubbly actress Grace (Tiffany Deobald), the murder victim. Grace lived alone.

The murder is a catalyst for a variety of shifting dynamics within the building; heightening suspicions, and driving self-advocacy and the realization that the tenants don’t particularly know each other that well. Their previous perceptions of safety and comfort profoundly shaken, no one in the building is the same. We see the dark and tender sides of the neighbours as the story unfolds; and everyone has their own way of coping. Janet binge-watches Friends on Netflix while others enjoy Law & Order SVU, Alma calls Murray out on a long-neglected repair to her place and Marion becomes Nancy Drew. Both terrified and fascinated by the strange Foley Artist who lives directly above her, Marion can’t stay away as he shows her the tricks of his trade, at her request, up in his place.

Outstanding work from the ensemble, riding a fine edge of comedy and psychothriller in this gripping, darkly funny tale of mystery, and dangers real and imagined. Noises in the dark—the young couple sexing or fighting, the Foley Artist at work, someone coming upon you suddenly—all take on new meaning and put everyone on edge. And some new, unexpected alliances are forged as well. What do you need to feel safe and comfortable in your own home? And how do women who live alone mitigate the risk? And how do you cope when the unthinkable happens so close to home?

With shouts to the design team for their gripping, atmospheric work on this production: composer/sound designer Richard Feren, set/costume designer Claire Hill and lighting designer Imogen Wilson.

A Girl Lives Alone has one more performance at SummerWorks: tonight (Aug 19) at 8:30 p.m.; advance tickets available online.

 

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SummerWorks: Three strangers reach out for connection in a city on fire in quirky, dark, thoughtful The Tall Building

TheTallBuilding-400x267A city on fire. Coyotes, and other wild and domestic animals wander the streets as people flee the flames and smoke to seek refuge in a safe place, on higher ground. The city has run out of firefighters. The mayor is nowhere to be found and rumour has it that she’s abandoned the city, hiding out in an underground bunker – or dead.

This is the world of It Could Still Happen’s production of The Tall Building, written/directed by Jill Connell – running at the Theatre Passe Muraille (TPM) Backspace for SummerWorks.

It is in this world that three unlikely relationships emerge: Sulla (Molly Flood), a young woman with a man’s name who always wears the same pair of jeans and is good at picking off coyotes with a rifle; the Assassin (Clinton Carew) who lives above her, from the Brotherhood of Assassins, believed to be the cause of all the fires; and the Boy (Philip Nozuka) who lives alone across the hall and writes a self-published community paper called City Streets, which he sets out on the newspaper rack at the local 7-Eleven (where he gets all his groceries). The Boy wants to interview Sulla for the paper because he finds her interesting. The Assassin wants to kill her. Sulla just wants to get out, go outside – go shopping maybe – but she can’t bring herself to leave or move to another apartment. And she doesn’t want people to know who she is. Throughout the course of the action, they get updates on the state of emergency from the radio via updates from Radio 1 (Ishan Davé) and Radio 2 (Brett Donahue).

Excellent work from the cast on this dystopic, near future tale of urban destruction and personal connections. Flood brings some lovely layers to Sulla, a haunted, guarded and cynical young woman, strong and fearless, yet so vulnerable and sad. Carew is comically ominous as the Assassin, a hooded, solitary professional who narrates his life aloud and reveals his role to the others. Is he just bored or is he showing off or overstating his abilities? Nozuka is delightful as the home-schooled Boy, bright and imaginative, precocious and brimming with a can-do positive attitude; he’s making the best of the situation, but he too knows that they can’t keep going the way they are – and he wants to be ready. All three are lost, abandoned and desperately longing for human contact – touch. Even the two radio guys (Davé and Donahue) have a deep, poignant connection, as one is out in the field reporting back to the station, while the other keeps listeners abreast of what’s going on. Everyone’s waiting out the fire, hoping for a change in the weather, something. Something to make things better so they can pick up the pieces and rebuild from the ashes. One thing for sure is nothing will ever be the same.

With big shouts to set/lighting designer Joe Pagnan for the multi-level scaffolding structure, which allows for a multi-layered playing space that features some acrobatic, jungle gym-like staging. The red on air light and fog set us firmly in the emergent, smoky environment of this world. And shouts to It Could Still Happen for a really cool, cleverly designed program – it’s a copy of City Streets, with three pieces, each written from the point of view of the three main characters, with production credits on the back page.

Three strangers reach out for connection in a high-rise above a city on fire in the quirky, dark and thoughtful The Tall Building.

The Tall Building has two more performances at the TPM Backspace: tonight (Sat, Aug 15) at 7:30 p.m. and tomorrow (Sun, Aug 16) at 3:00 p.m.