Sex, death, snakes & the healing power of flowers & family in Red Betty Theatre & the G Girls’ political, theatrical Ganga’s Ganja

We struggle in birth. We struggle in death.

I popped over to Geary Lane last night for Storefront Theatre’s presentation of Red Betty Theatre and the G Girls’ production of Radha S. Menon’s Ganga’s Ganja, directed by Jennie Esdale. Ganga’s Ganja headlines the Feminist Fuck It Festival (FFIF), a two-week curated festival of multidisciplinary women and non-binary-identifying artists presenting new, bold and entertaining works.

Set sometime in the not too distant future, sisters Mena (Pam Patel) and Ganga (Senjuti Aurora Sarker) have gone off the grid, living on a piece of land where Ganga grows and tends to medicinal marijuana to help ease Mena’s excruciating Multiple Sclerosis symptoms and give her some quality of life. Ever moving in and out of Mena’s consciousness is Kadru (Amanda DeFreitas), a black and gold snake that only Mena can see. Is Mena hallucinating or is Kadru her escort into the next life?

While Mena self-medicates with weed, deeply inhaling the smoke like oxygen, Ganga’s medicine is one-night stands that often keep her out all night, always returning to her caregiving in the morning. Mena is afraid of leaving Ganga alone, and Ganga is terrified of losing Mena. When their marijuana crop is stolen and they meet the fast-talking, charmer Nero (Jesse Horvath), a man with a shiny silver briefcase and a lot of ideas, the sisters’ world is turned upside down. In a world where non-prescription drugs have been criminalized, but big pharma is happy to use plants to create their products, who can they trust—and how will they find a way to let go of each other?

Political and theatrical, the themes of sex, death and alternative medicine combine with feminism, Hindu deities and sticking it to the man. Patel and Sarker have great chemistry as the sisters; and do a nice job layering their respective inner and outer conflicts. Patel’s Mena is cheerful and positive, despite her devastating diagnosis—this all masking her concern, which is more for her sister than for herself. Mena wants to die, to leave her suffering behind and start over in the next life, but she can’t bring herself to leave Ganga. As Ganga, Sarker is a combination of attentive caregiver and devil-may-care party girl; drowning her guilt and fear in random hook-ups, Ganga struggles with the harsh truth that Mena doesn’t have much time left. DeFreitas brings a sensual and fierce edge to Kadru; ever watchful and ever waiting, Kadru is not the menace she appears to be—and appears to represent the faith, tradition and ritual of the sisters’ Indian ancestors. Horvath’s Nero is the perfect picture of white, male entitlement; charming, mercurial and donning a bad boy rebel image, Nero is a 21st century snake oil salesman dealing in mainstream pharmaceuticals. He is the embodiment of Western right-wing conservative, corporate misogyny—all wrapped up in a pretty bleach blond, white linen package.

With shouts to the design team—Tony Sciara (set), Tula Tusox (costume) and Maddie Bautista (sound)—for their work in creating this evocative, otherworldly space that reflects both the South Asian culture of the sisters, and an intriguing environment that’s out of time and space.

Sex, death, snakes and the healing power of flowers and family in Red Betty Theatre and the G Girls’ political, theatrical Ganga’s Ganja.

Ganga’s Ganja continues at FFIF at Geary Lane (360 Geary Ave., Toronto) until April 22, every night (except Mondays) at 7:30 pm and Sundays at 2:00 pm, followed by nightly programming at 9:00 pm and 10:30 pm. Get advanced tickets for Ganga’s Ganja online and check out the rest of the FFIF line-up.

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Toronto Fringe: A delightful & moving journey across time & space, love & family in Rukmini’s Gold

rukminis_goldWent to see the Rukmini’s Gold, by Radha S. Menon – the winner of the 2015 Toronto Fringe new play contest – directed by Wes Berger and running at the Factory Theatre Mainspace.

An old woman (Rukmini, played by Dia Frid) in a white sari waits alone on a bench at a train station. Clutching a jewelry case and carrying a single suitcase, she reminisces about her life and family. A 12-year-old girl (Maya Huliyappa-Menon) joins her, and she is carried off on a journey of faces, memories and visions of the future. The hardships, happiness and lives of Rukmini’s family play out over the course of many years, across several countries – all bound by the precious family necklaces and bangles she leaves them to remember her by.

Really nice work from this ensemble, most of whom (except for Frid) play multiple characters: Frid, Huliyappa-Menon, Tony Sciara, Vivek Hariharan, Rishma Malik-Scott, Ellora Patnaik and Brittany Miranda, supported by understudy Sindhuri Nandhakumar. The scenes between Rukmini and the girl are particularly compelling and bookend the play nicely. Frid’s Rukmini plays up her age – her “condition” – but she is sharp as a tack and decidedly feisty. Huliyappa-Menon’s girl is precocious, energetic and bright, full of playful mischief. Who she is, I’ll leave for you to decide for yourselves – so you’ll have to go see this.

With shouts to the beautiful, evocative – and haunting – work of costume/props designer Kelly Wolf and sound designer Nicholas Walsh.

Rukmini’s Gold is a delightful, moving journey across time and space, love and family.

Rukmini’s Gold has one more performance at the Factory Theatre Mainspace: Sun, July 12 at 7:00 p.m.