Betrayal & ruin to forgiveness & reunion, with witty, rollicking good times in As You Like It

Photo by Daniela Mason: George Brown Theatre School class of 2017

The George Brown Theatre School class of 2017 takes us back to a time of rum-running gangsters in their production of As You Like It (directed by Geoffrey Pounsett), currently running in rep with A Midsummer Night’s Dream (directed by alum Aaron Willis) in the Tank House Theatre at the Young Centre for the Performing Arts, located in Toronto’s Distillery District. I dropped by the Young Centre for As You Like It yesterday afternoon.

We learn via a remarkably staged prologue, set as a silent film reel delightfully set up by the Fool Touchstone (Thomas Nyhuus), how Duke Senior (Chase Jeffels) was betrayed by his brother Frederick (Jake Runeckles) and banished, his organization taken over by the traitorous Frederick, who becomes the new Duke. Duke Frederick allows his niece Rosalind (Justine Christensen) to stay as a companion for his daughter Celia (Geneviéve DeGraves), who is very fond of her bff cousin.

In a parallel tale of sibling betrayal, Orlando (Seamus Dillon-Easton) has endured a life of abuse and neglect at the hand of his older sister Olivia (Lucy Meanwell), who has betrayed their father Sir Rowland’s charge to look after her younger brother after his death. When Orlando goes to test his mettle in a wrestling match with Charles (Jeffels), a favourite of the new Duke, he crosses paths with Rosalind and the two are mutually smitten. Winning the match, Orlando also wins a new enemy in the Duke, and returns home to learn from the faithful family servant Adam (Patrick Horan) that his sister is plotting to kill him—prompting him to flee, with Adam accompanying him.

Displeased at Rosalind’s popularity with a sympathetic public, and wary that this will reflect badly on his daughter, the Duke banishes Rosalind. In an ultimate act of friendship and loyalty, Celia elects to go with her; and the two concoct disguises so they may travel in safety, with Rosalind dressing as a man called Ganymede and Celia as his sister Aliena. Enlisting the Touchstone as their travelling companion, they too flee their home.

Meanwhile, Orlando and Adam have made their way to the forest of Arden, where they come upon Duke Senior and a group of loyal followers, who are living a merry rustic life in the woods. Merry, except for sad sack Jaques (Parmida Vand), who perceives all on the darker, melancholy side. Now living in the forest and pining for Rosalind, Orlando takes to praising her dear name in poetry and posting it on the trees.

Rosalind, Celia and Touchstone find themselves a cottage in the forest; and Rosalind discovers Orlando’s poetry on the trees. To test his love, she (as Ganymede) tells Orlando she can cure his love sickness if he comes to woo him as if he were Rosalind. Meanwhile lovesick neighbouring shepherd Silvius (Evan MacKenzie) is pursuing the uninterested Phebe (Gabriella Albino), who becomes love struck when she meets Ganymede/Rosalind. Even Touchstone finds a sweetheart: the lovely, simple shepherdess Audrey (Jocelyn Feltham).

Orlando’s sister Olivia arrives on the scene after getting a taste of her own medicine from the Duke, forcing her to flee to the forest. She comes to Ganymede/Rosalind and Aliena/Celia with news of Orlando, who has been seriously wounded by a lioness while saving her. Contrite and seeking redemption for her wrong-doing, she has joined Duke Senior, who was a good friend to her father. And, not to leave Celia out of the romance, she and Olivia are obviously and immediately taken with each other. Realizing she truly loves Orlando—and left with two love knots to untangle—Rosalind plans a wedding in the woods, promising to sort everything out, including the plight of lovesick shepherd Silvius and the callous Phebe.

And all is revealed at the wedding, with much merriment, music and dancing—and Rosalind reunited with her father, who is restored to his office in yet another fortuitous twist of Shakespearean fate.

Excellent work from the ensemble, who get ample opportunity to showcase their considerable music and vocal chops with a number of delightful songs and musical numbers—led by music directors/composers/classmates Lucas Penner and Jake Runeckles.

Stand-out performances include Christensen, who is luminous as the brave, witty and resourceful Rosalind; great chemistry with Dillon-Easton’s Orlando, who goes from courageous risk-taker in endeavor to bashful mute in the face of love. Both become adorably moonstruck silly in love.

DeGraves gives Celia a feisty and fiery spark; deeply loyal to the point of defying her cruel father, Celia leaves her lush city life behind to find herself, hilariously, a fish out of water in the country. Meanwell does a nice job with Olivia’s salvation; going from snake-like cruelty to kind repentance, and finding herself shot with Cupid’s arrow when she meets Celia (lovely chemistry there as well).

Nyhuus is a treat as the saucy Touchstone; cocky and always up for a debate, like Celia he’s not thrilled to be away from the comforts of home, but valiantly makes the best of it as he diverts himself with lusty pursuits of his own. And Vand gives us an engaging and entertaining Jaques; a melancholy loner who takes cheer in Touchstone’s shenanigans, her pessimism rings with the air of a realist resigned to the true nature of the world, which can often be a cruel joke.

With big shouts to the design team for their work on creating this magical, industrial meets pastoral world: Ken MacKenzie (set), Shannon Lea Doyle (costumes) and Michelle Ramsay (lighting); and to Simon Fon (fight choreography) and Robert McCollum (dance choreography).

Betrayal and ruin to forgiveness and reunion, with witty, rollicking good times in As You Like It.

As You Like It continues at the Young Centre in the Tank House Theatre until Feb 18; A Midsummer Night’s Dream also runs until Feb 18; click here for ticket and pass info or book by calling the box office at 416-866-8666. It’s a great chance to see emerging acting talent before they head out into their careers.

You can also keep up with George Brown Theatre’s class of 2017 on Twitter and Facebook.

Fond, foolish love & trickster shenanigans in the roaringly entertaining Twelfth Night

Shakespeare BASH’d continues its 2016-17 season with a ripping version of Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night; directed by James Wallis with associate director Drew O’Hara, and opening to a sold out house at the Monarch Tavern last night.

Set in the 1920s, and inspired by the music, speak easy atmosphere and carpe diem abandon of that decade, this version of Twelfth Night also hits notes of melancholy and the lost innocence of a society that’s just come through its first world war—self-medicating with jazz and booze, and grabbing love and happiness when and where they can.

Orsino (Shawn Ahmed) is deeply in love with Olivia (Hallie Seline), but she is in deep mourning for her father and now her brother, whose death occurred soon after. Meanwhile, Viola (Jade Douris) has washed ashore, surviving a ship wreck in which she fears her twin brother Sebastian was lost. Aware that she is a woman alone and setting foot on less than friendly territory, she disguises herself as a page named Cesario and goes to work for Orsino. Seizing an opportunity to utilize the pretty youth, Orsino sends Cesario/Viola to press his suit to Olivia—leaving Olivia smitten with Cesario, which is beyond awkward for Cesario/Viola, as she’s fallen in love with Orsino.

In Olivia’s household, her drunken uncle Sir Toby Belch (Daniel Briere), ignored suitor Sir Andrew Aguecheek (Jesse Nerenberg) and sassy gentlewoman Maria (Julia Nish-Lapidus) plot revenge on Olivia’s severe, proud steward Malvolio (Jesse Griffiths) with the help of the newly returned Feste (a female Fool in trousers played by Lesley Robertson) and the local parish priest Fabian (Augusto Bitter).

Meanwhile, we learn that Viola’s brother Sebastian (Jeff Yung) has survived the wreck; saved by the ship’s captain Antonio (Nate Bitton), now a good friend and devoted to Sebastian. And, of course, as this is Shakespeare, there’s a comedy of errors with the twins—and as it’s a comedy, it all works out in the end. But this is a comedy with dark undertones, particularly with the tricks played on Malvolio, which go from harmless prank to gas lighting; and there is an edge of wounded melancholy evident in all the characters.

Really nice work from the ensemble, who invite the audience along the journey, bringing us into this world. Stand-outs include Seline’s Olivia, a lovely and richly layered performance; a proud, strong woman, Olivia has sharp enough wit to match any man, but also a tender and fragile heart. Seline conveys as much from a facial expression as she does with the text. Griffiths does a great job with Malvolio; stiff and imperious, with a nasty, prideful underbelly, the self-righteous Malvolio is too self-involved and delighted to see what’s really going on when the others punk him.

Robertson drops the mic as Feste; hilariously witty and a master debater, she too has a soft heart—especially for Curio—and we get the sense that, beneath all her tomfoolery, she’s come through the war deeply hurt. And Briere and Nerenberg make for a very funny, odd team as the drunken, layabout Belch and awkward, clueless Aguecheek.

Speaking of tomfoolery, the letter reveal scene is particularly hilarious, with Belch, Aguecheek and Fabian rushing about to hide as they watch Malvolio read a love letter he believes to be for him from Olivia; as is the duel scene between the terrified Aguecheek and Douris’s adorably baffled and equally petrified Cesario/Viola.

Opening with music selections from the period—and featuring accompaniment (guitar, ukulele and piano), lovely vocals and original music by Franziska Beeler (as Curio)—there’s a sexy, jazzy vibe to this production; and nicely bookended with the dance number (choreographed by Douris) at the curtain call.

Fond, foolish love and trickster shenanigans in the roaringly entertaining Twelfth Night.

Twelfth Night continues at the Monarch Tavern until February 5; it’s a short run and they’re already sold out, but if you show up early, they may be able to squeeze you in. Please note the 7:30pm start time for evening performances; there are also matinees at 2pm on February 4 and 5.

Keep up with Shakespeare BASH’d on Twitter and Facebook.

Photo by Kyle Purcell: Jesse Nerenberg, Julia Nish-Lapidus & Daniel Briere, with Jesse Griffiths’ legs

Toronto Fringe: A most outrageously funny mashup in Romeo & Juliet Chainsaw Massacre

romeo_and_juliet_and_a_chainsaw-wielding_maniac

Bain & Bernard Comedy has cooked up one helluva theatrical mashup for Toronto Fringe with its production of Matt Bernard’s Romeo and Juliet Chainsaw Massacre, directed by Bernard and running to packed houses at the Randolph Theatre.

Inspired by a variety of horror films throughout the decades, particularly The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, Halloween, Friday the 13th, Scream and The Tower of London, we find Romeo and Juliet’s Verona under advisement (via 1950s radio-style broadcasts) that a deranged killer is on the loose after escaping from a local asylum. Dialogue from Romeo and Juliet is combined with modern language to great comic effect, and all hilarious hell breaks loose during the campy fun scenes of stalking and dismemberment.

The kick-ass ensemble has excellent comic timing, and does an amazing job with the hybrid language, chainsaw mayhem SFX and fight scenes. Stand-outs include Sarite Harris’s feisty Nurse; Michael Iliadis’s dramatic Mercutio; Brittany Kay’s sassy Juliet; Jeremy Lapalme’s saucy Peter the Illiterate Servant; Victor Pokinko’s slapdash Benvolio; Nicolas Porteous’s serious, misunderstood Romeo; and Scott Garland’s cocky, sleazy County Paris.

All the key plot points of an abbreviated Romeo and Juliet plus the over-the-top gruesome fun of horror schlock. What more could you ask for?

Star-crossed lovers! Codpieces! Chainsaws! A most outrageously funny Shakespeare/horror film mashup in Romeo and Juliet Chainsaw Massacre.

Romeo and Juliet Chainsaw Massacre continues at the Randolph Theatre until July 10; get your tickets in advance for this one, kids, these guys are packing them in there. For ticket info and advance tickets/passes, check out the Fringe website.

A delightfully magical production – Driftwood Theatre Group’s The Tempest

tempestWe are such stuff as dreams are made on; and our little life is rounded with a sleep…

Saw some delightful outdoor Shakespeare last night: Driftwood Theatre Group’s performance of its Bard’s Bus Tour production of The Tempest at Withrow Park. Directed by D. Jeremy Smith, collaborating with text editor/dramaturg Toby Malone, this Tempest is updated and full of awesome surprises.

Opening with the departure of King Alonso and his retinue on his private jet, and the eventual enchanted crash landing on a charmed island (here, Stephano is the drunken pilot and Trinculo the goofball gal flight attendant), the storm sequence is very cleverly – and playfully – staged, complete with a model airplane, hoist aloft by the actors on its wobbly and harrowing descent.

Played out on a circus-like ring of stones, Prospero weaves his magic, overseeing the meeting and courtship of his daughter Miranda and young Prince Ferdinand, and orchestrating the reunion of the shipwrecked nobles, which also includes his traitorous brother, the power-hungry sister of the King and a loyal old friend. Here, the island spirits that serve him are artfully rendered puppets: Ariel a delicate, gossamer creature with retractable wings; and Caliban a near life-sized thing of earth, stone and gills, emerging from his camouflaged hiding place and operated by two actors. As the play progresses, Caliban undergoes a surprising metamorphosis, getting smaller – to Muppet-sized, then finger puppet – as his power weakens.

Featuring a lovely, otherworldly a cappella soundtrack by composer/musical director Tom Lillington and an excellent cast, The Tempest takes the audience on a two-hour journey of wonder, fun and philosophy. Richard Alan Campbell does a lovely job of balancing Prospero’s righteous indignation and rage with a deep melancholy and longing to right his life – for both himself and his daughter – and live out the remainder of his days at home. Miriam Fernandes is sweetly innocent and wide-eyed, and full of youthful wisdom as Miranda; and Kaleb Alexander is adorably awkward and gallant as the love-smitten Ferdinand. Cast stand-outs also include double-duty performances by Madeleine Donohue, playing a cheeky, goofy Trinculo, and the lovely and enchanting Ariel; and Peter van Gestel, as the outrageously drunken and cocky Stephano, and the sullen and vengeful Caliban. Donohue also provides some beautiful vocals as Ariel and sings an ethereal duet with Christina Gordon (a female Gonzalo, as well as one of the island spirits), with Gordon’s gorgeous voice perfectly combining, and creating an atmosphere of charm and wonder.

With big shouts to the design team: Lokki Ma (props), Melanie McNeill (costumes) and director Smith (set) for their brilliant work in this magical production.

Driftwood Theatre’s touring production of The Tempest is an ethereal, magical and highly entertaining production, featuring some delightful surprises and an equally delightful ensemble.

You have two more chances to catch The Tempest at Withrow Park: tonight (July 26) and tomorrow (July 27) – please note the 7:30 p.m. start time. The tour makes stops at various locations across Ontario until August 17 – check here for dates and locations. Some performances feature pre-show performance Food of Love, an a cappella concert (6:30 p.m. start) of the music of Driftwood Theatre, which is celebrating its 20th season this year, as well as pre-show and late night chats.

 

In time so long ago, adventure so passing awesome – Driftwood Theatre’s fundraiser reading of William Shakespeare’s Star Wars

So much big time awesome fun WSSW 2014 Poster Artwork webat Whistler’s Grille last night for Driftwood Theatre Group’s 20th season fundraiser reading of Ian Doescher’s William Shakespeare’s Star Wars (Quirk Books): Play in a Pub: William Shakespeare’s Star Wars.

Driftwood A.D. Jeremy Smith put together an incredible cast for this hilarious and engaging evening of theatrical literature/movie mash-up. Joseph Ziegler* did a marvelous job with Obi Wan Kenobi, all wry wit and wisdom. Oliver Dennis was a delight as the prissy and formal C3P0, and Melissa D’Agostino* was adorably Puck-like as R2D2. Dion Johnstone, suitably attired in a black leather vest, brought the perfect balance of cocky and charm to Han Solo. Michael Hanrahan’s smooth bass voice and gravitas were bang-on for Darth Vader. Sarah Wilson was lovely and sassy as Princess Leia. Richard Alan Campbell brought a nice Shakespearean officiousness to The Chorus. Peter van Gestel used all the colours in the box for Luke Skywalker, from the restless boy longing for adventure to resourceful, brave (and love-smitten) young warrior. Awesome voice work/mimicking from Karl Ang as Jabba the Hutt, Lori Nancy Kalamanski as Chewbacca and Helen King as Greedo (all playing multiple roles throughout); and Andy Pogson did a nice job with multiple roles, including Wedge Antilles and some hapless stormtrooper dudes. Steven Gallagher brought it sly and snake-like – was he channeling Olivier? – as Governor Tarkin. And Steven Burley was awesomesauce outstanding in his role as music and sound effects master – all done with his voice, including the Twentieth Century Fox theme music before launching into the John Williams soundtrack at the beginning of the reading!

Driftwood rounded up some excellent prizes for the evening’s auction and raffles, including a live auction for walk-on roles during the reading and a prize for the best costume.  

We did have a blast. We did feel good. And I’m hoping Mr. Doescher continues writing these Shakespeare/Star Wars mash-ups so Driftwood can do this again. I’d love to hear Burley do “Yoda’s Theme.”

*Casting change: RH Thompson was originally set to play Obi Wan Kenobi and Michael Therriault was to read R2D2.

Words, words, words

When I stopped by The Moose Show at the CBC atrium a couple of weeks ago, I ordered a pair of silver cufflinks from Liz Kain’s Shakespeare collection – with the quote To Thine Own Self Be True on them – and they arrived in my mail box the other day. I was very excited and look forward to wearing them to upcoming holiday gatherings. Check out Liz’s work sometime: http://www.lizkain.com/

Words are very important to me. I love writing them, speaking them, playing with them and discovering them. I’m a big fan of Shakespeare, a well-crafted turn of phrase and stimulating conversation. And, since I’m a copyeditor/proofreader/fact-checker by day (by chance), I love seeing websites like this one (thanks to co-worker/pal Brenda Sharpe for alerting me). Get ready to laugh. A lot.

http://shitmystudentswrite.tumblr.com/