Art & literature come out to play together at the Leon Rooke & John Metcalf Salon Exhibition

I had the great pleasure of attending the Leon Rooke and John Metcalf Salon Exhibition last night, hosted by Fran Hill Gallery at Rooke’s residence at 246 Brunswick Ave., Toronto—also the new contact space for the gallery since it moved from its St. Clair W./Christie neighbourhood Show Room. The event featured Rooke’s latest paintings andContinue reading “Art & literature come out to play together at the Leon Rooke & John Metcalf Salon Exhibition”

Playfully whimsical, profoundly poignant & sharply candid ruminations in Dawna J. Wightman’s honey be

Dawna J. Wightman. Photo by Vince Lupo.   Montreal-born Dawna J. Wightman is an award-winning Toronto-based actor, playwright and writer. Toronto audiences will recognize Wightman from her solo show Life as a Pomegranate, as well as Yellow Birds (Alumnae Theatre’s FireWorks Festival, 2015) and A Mickey Full of Mouse (Buddies in Bad Times Theatre, 2016Continue reading “Playfully whimsical, profoundly poignant & sharply candid ruminations in Dawna J. Wightman’s honey be”

Interview: Lizzie Violet

Lizzie Violet—photo by Anna Lozyk Romeo Happy International Women’s Day! Today’s post is an interview with an incredibly talented, hard-working, gutsy and generous woman in the Toronto arts scene. Lizzie Violet is a writer, spoken word artist and horror aficionado—that “dark little girl with the crooked grin” who took her finely tuned, quirky sense ofContinue reading “Interview: Lizzie Violet”

Compelling, poetic, unflinchingly honest snapshots of working class people in Of Being Underground & Moving Backwards

Where do the words Interrupted Of the working class people go? Lost somewhere within their time Interrupted. This is the prologue to Heather Babcock’s chapbook Of Being Underground and Moving Backwards, a collection of short stories published by DevilHousePress. A compelling and vividly detailed collection of works, Of Being Underground and Moving Backwards opens withContinue reading “Compelling, poetic, unflinchingly honest snapshots of working class people in Of Being Underground & Moving Backwards”