Literary family snapshots told with unflinching candor & wry humour in Pamela Williams’ Evelyn’s Stories

Cover photo of Evelyn by Pamela Williams.

 

I had the pleasure of attending the launch of Pamela Williams’ new book Evelyn’s Stories at a reading to a packed room on Sunday at the Tranzac Club. Known mostly for her beautiful, haunting black and white photographs of cemetery sculpture, Williams has assembled a collection of brief stories, as told to her by her mother Evelyn—and some handed down to Evelyn by her mother—in a series of short vignettes. Evelyn’s Stories are literary snapshots of family across time and space, ranging from 1900s Glasgow, to 1930s Thornbury and into the 1970s and beyond.

Told with unflinching candor, sharp detail and wry humour, Evelyn’s Stories is a window on moments of personal history and experience; inviting us for brief peeks (the stories are postcard-sized or slightly longer) inside the world of Williams’ family, as told to her by her mother, and to her mother by her grandmother.

20191027_141223
Pamela Williams reads at the launch of Evelyn’s Stories

It’s family biography as comedy and drama, with eyebrow-raising tales of marriage and infidelity (“When Hector Married Stella” and “Keep Toby Out, England, 1907”); charming and funny childhood shenanigans and observations (“Bathtub Visitor” and “Divorce”); memories of brutal and sweet elementary school teachers (“Mrs. Pinch” and “Miss Chalk’s Replacement”); tragic loss (“New Spectacles, Glasgow, 1906”); hilarious social interactions (“That’s Why I Asked You” and “At the Cinema”); and harrowing but comical senior driving mishaps (“Two Motorcycles” and “A Ride on the Wild Side”).

As the family tales shift from poignant, to comic, to tragic, to saucy, Evelyn’s Stories captures the heart, lives, loves and experiences of generations of family who crossed the ocean from Glasgow, Scotland to settle in rural/small-town Ontario, Canada.

Check out Williams’ book collection online, including her photography books; order via email.

 

 

Toronto Fringe: Millennials surviving working & adulting in the lighthearted, satirical Above & Beyond

Seated: Tatyana Mitchell & Natasha Ramondino. Standing: Felix Beauchamp, Rabiya Mansoor, Andrea Irwin & Francis Masaba. Set and costume design by Jules Mendoza. Photo by Angela Sun.

 

JackieTol Productions gives us a lighthearted, satirical look at slogging it out in an office cubicle as two Millennial pals try to survive working and adulting in Jaclyn Toledano’s Above & Beyond, directed by Rebecca Ballarin and running in the Robert Gill Theatre.

BFFs Jamie (Tatyana Mitchell) and Nicole (Natasha Ramondino) are sales reps at Bright Star Tours, a travel agency that specializes in educational tour packages for schools. Former employees of Oyster Tours, Bright Star’s biggest competitor, Jamie is killing it at their new company, while Nicole—who used to also rock—is now struggling. Both are dying of boredom at this dead-end job, but Jamie’s able to play the game; Nicole not so much.

Added to the mix are their warm, technically-challenged boss Tracey (Andrea Irwin), and colleagues Steph the go-getter (Rabiya Mansoor), macho dude Brett (Francis Masaba) and charmer Jared (Felix Beauchamp). We also get a glimpse into Oyster Travel, a larger organization with a more corporate vibe, and their shark-like staff (played variously by Mansoor, Irwin, Beauchamp and Masaba)—who are stunned and perplexed that smaller fish Bright Star is outperforming them. Could it be that former employees Jamie and Nicole are now Bright Star’s secret weapons? And what’s the deal with Tracey’s hard-ass replacement Andrea (also played by Irwin)?

From soul-destroying moments on the job, to presentations, holiday parties and advice on Tinder swiping, anyone who’s worked in a cubicle farm will certainly recognize these characters and workplace situations—and shouts to the cast for their sharply drawn work. Mitchell and Ramondino are nicely matched, with Mitchell’s chill Jamie taking their situation in stride, her friendly out-going nature endearing her to the teachers she pitches to. But being too easy-going can land you in trouble sometimes. Ramondino’s Nicole is reminiscent of Anna Kendrick in Pitch Perfect; wry-witted and cynical, she’s wondering WTF she’s doing there and if it’s the right place for her—and if she’ll ever get her sales groove back.

Outstanding character work from Irwin, switching from the amiable, supportive boss Tracey, to the sharp corporate Oyster employee, to the scary mean girl boss Andrea and the sweet, protective teacher Helen. Mansoor brings big LOLs as Steph the uber keener; you know the type, and you’re never quite sure if it’s all a put-on or if they’re really that into their job. Masaba also brings the comedy as the office’s bro about town Brett; full of himself and utterly clueless about how he comes across, Brett is clearly enjoying his cruise through work and life. And Beauchamp is adorably charming as Jared, bringing just the right amount of slick to make you wonder if he’s actually a good guy or not.

It’s fun, it’s relatable—and you may find yourself asking if you’re living to work or working to live. And sometimes, it takes a little while to get your work groove back.

Above and Beyond continues at the Robert Gill Theatre to July 13. Check the show page for exact dates/times and advance tickets.

Desperate desires, power struggles & parental POV in the compelling, sharply funny Trigonometry

Rose Napoli & Alison Dean in Trigonometry—photo by Greg Wong

 

Gabriella wants action. Jackson wants a scholarship. Susan wants a family.

timeshare opened the third and final installment of Rob Kempson’s The Graduation Plays trilogy with the world premiere of Trigonometry this past week, directed by Kempson and running in the Factory Theatre Studio. I caught Trigonometry yesterday afternoon.

Math teacher Gabriella (Rose Napoli), substitute teacher/guidance counsellor Susan (Alison Dean) and student Jackson (Daniel Ellis) find their lives intertwined as their desires collide in a high-stakes, power struggle dynamic. Scandalous photos, sports team hazing allegations and personal revelations come into play in a series of intense, at times hilarious, two-hander moments—culminating in a gripping final scene when the three stories triangulate.

Outstanding work from the cast on this trio of disparate characters locked in a battle of wills. Great chemistry between Napoli and Dean in a diametrically opposed, sharply funny dynamic of opposites. Napoli’s Gabriella is sassy, ballsy and a passionate teacher; a divorced single mom with conservative, black and white views of the world, particularly the new sex ed curriculum. Direct and possessing a sardonic sense of humour, Rose is recently single and ready to mingle—and active on Tinder. Dean brings a sweet, kind quality to the progressive Susan; no doormat, Susan is open to hearing all sides of an argument and willing to navigate the grey areas—in many ways, the perfect guidance counsellor. Tasked with investigating persons of interest around a volleyball team hazing, Susan is a reluctant investigator, but willing to do her duty; she’s also chosen to start her own family, on her own with a sperm donor pregnancy. Ellis’s Jackson is a likeable kid with just the right amount of smart-ass; a gifted athlete struggling with math and driven to make his parents proud, Jackson has considerable strategizing skills—and perhaps too wily for his own good. Was he involved in that hazing?

2. Rose Napoli and Daniel Ellis. Trigonometry. Photo by Greg Wong.
Rose Napoli & Daniel Ellis in Trigonometry—photo by Greg Wong

Parental point of view plays prominently in each story, driving decisions and opinions. All three characters are basically good people—and the situations in which they find themselves test how far they’re willing to go to get what they want. In the end, much is left up to us to sort out.

With shouts to set/costume designer Anna Treusch and scenic painter Simge Suzer for the trippy math class chalkboard set.

Desperate desires, power struggles and parental POV in the compelling, sharply funny Trigonometry.

Trigonometry continues in the Factory Theatre Studio until Mar 25. You can find the full schedule and ticket info here; advance tix available online or by calling 416-504-9971.

In the meantime, check out playwright Rob Kempson’s interview with host Phil Rickaby on Stageworthy Podcast.