Toronto Fringe: Love vs. consent in the candid, intimate, autobiographical The Girl in the Photograph

Andrea Cabeza & David Chinchilla. Photo by Liliana Vera.

 

She signed her love notes with “The Girl in the Photograph”. He signed his with “Prince Charming”. She was 14 when their love affair began.

Chameleon Productions presents the true story of love behind the scenes at a young theatre company in Mexico with their Toronto Fringe production of The Girl in the Photograph. Created by Andrea Cabeza, written by Joel Pettigrew, and directed by Victoria Urquhart with associate director Melissa Fearon, the play is currently running in the Factory Theatre Studio.

This story of rule-breaking love begins in a police station interview room, where 15-year-old Paula (Andrea Cabeza) has been left stewing for hours; she is finally joined by Ofelia (Erin Roche), who is there to take her statement. Shifting back in time, we witness Paula’s story unfold. A gifted emerging young actor, Paula comes to work with 26-year-old Beto’s (David Chinchilla) theatre company, whose primary source of funding is the wealthy father of Beto’s live-in girlfriend Martina (Roche). Working hard and honing her craft, Paula shares with Beto a passion for Shakespeare and storytelling—and their actor student/director mentor relationship evolves into a secret passion for each other. Observing from the sidelines is Beto’s SM/assistant Alexia (Tamara Almeida), who is well-aware of Beto’s reputation with women, especially lovely and talented young actresses.

Conflicted and fearing for Paula’s safety, Alexia’s detached observation borders on complicity when she offers to drive Paula to Beto’s home for their secret romantic meetings. Conflicted herself, Paula struggles with Beto’s endless excuses for delaying his break-up with Martina—and Martina’s pregnancy adds an additional complication. Paula knows she should leave him, but can’t bring herself to do it. And when the relationship is revealed to Paula’s mother, their world is blown apart.

Beautifully nuanced, honest and respectful performances from the cast in this candid, intimate autobiographical piece. Like the love vs. consent scenario we saw onstage last fall with Rose Napoli’s Lo (or Dear Mr. Wells)—which portrayed a student/teacher relationship, told from the point of view of the student—The Girl in the Photograph forces us to question our position. Is a minor, no matter how wise beyond her years she may be, truly able to consent to a sexual relationship with an adult? Where does the onus lie in such a situation? In the end, Paula is left to work through the impact—both positive and negative—on her personal and professional life, and find closure as she chooses the path her life takes next.

With shouts to the design and music teams: Original music by Marina Lopez, performed live on acoustic guitar by Owen Gardner, sound design by Johnny Salib, and production design by Ruth Albertyn.

The Girl in the Photograph continues in the Factory Theatre Studio until July 15; check the show page for exact dates/times.

Toronto Fringe: Waiting for Godot meets Brazil – in space – in bizarro, quirky fun Waiting for Alonzo

waiting_for_alonzo_18-250x250Buckle your seatbelts, kids, ‘cuz it’s going to be a bumpy ride. In space. Post-apocalyptic satire in Empty Box Theatre Company’s [link] production of Waiting for Alonzo, written and directed by Keavy Lynch – running at the Theatre Passe Muraille (TPM) Mainspace for Toronto Fringe.

In a post-apocalyptic time in the near future, a lone ship floats through space. The ship’s captain and all-around bossy boots Doctor Zanita (Victoria Urquhart) has seen a single life form reading scurry across their monitor and is convinced that Alonzo is coming. The anticipation of his arrival throws her into a right tizzy, and she wants everything to be perfect. Beside herself, she bursts into a flurry of activity, ordering her faithful assistant Bielke (Hayley Malouin) around, and pestering her hunky talking computer man statue Andre (Kevin Chew) for assessments of her appearance. Of course, it’s all futile. And all for a man!

Victoria Urquhart & Hayley Malouin in Waiting for Alonzo
Victoria Urquhart & Hayley Malouin in Waiting for Alonzo

Urquhart’s Doctor Zanita is a mean girl with a PhD, obsessed with body modification (with comic results) in her efforts to become a perfect ‘10’ – a pathetic mess underneath the arrogant attitude and gorgeous, Barbie doll body. Malouin is a delight as the adorably sweet (or is she?), put-upon Bielke; mistreated by her employer, but cheerfully sharing some comically maudlin advice on the bright side of death with the audience when she has a moment to herself. Chew’s Andre is a calm and static observer, a highly sophisticated computer programmed to respond honestly to Zanita’s personal questions; he has a particularly fun moment, which I won’t spoil here.

The futility of Doctor Zanita’s efforts at “beauty” is particularly pathetic in light of her education and brilliance as a scientist (she built the damn ship, after all); choosing to spend her time and energy on plastic surgery (highlighted in a particular grotesquely hilarious scene) as she awaits the arrival of a man instead of – oh, I don’t know – searching for an inhabitable planet, or finding and rescuing other survivors.

With shouts to designer Nicole Titus for the wacky, spacy set, props and costumes.
Waiting for Alonzo is Waiting for Godot meets Brazil – in space – in this bizarro, quirky fun post-apocalyptic tale.

Waiting for Alonzo has two more performances at the TPM Mainspace: July 10 at 7:30 p.m. and July 11 at 5:45 p.m.