Soul reviving human connection in the entertaining, engaging, enlightening Pearle Harbour’s Chautauqua

Justin Miller as Pearle Harbour, with Steven Conway in the background. Production design by Joseph Pagnan, with tent by Haley Reap. Lighting design by Jareth Li. Photo by Dahlia Katz.

 

Pearle Harbour invites you into the milky folds of her tent for some soul reviving human connection in the engaging, entertaining, enlightening Pearle Harbour’s Chautauqua, written and performed by Justin Miller, accompanied by Steven Conway and directed by Byron Laviolette. The sold-out SummerWorks 2017 Audience Choice Award-winning show returns to its home base at Theatre Passe Muraille as it opens TPM’s 2018-19 season.

As you’re ushered into the Mainspace through the stage door and walk towards the tent, you pass various collections of objects from another time and place; an acoustic guitar, a vintage typewriter, wooden crates. There’s a bar, too, just before you get to the opening of the tent; and Conway is there with your seating assignment. Finding your bench to sit inside the tent, you see text stencilled on each wall: SPEAK TRUTH, LIVE PURE, RIGHT THE WRONG, FOLLOW THE WAY. Three strings of Edison bulbs hang from the ceiling; and you can hear fiddle music and a man’s voice speaking—poetry, philosophy?

Our hostess joins us, singing “Come on Up to the House” as she enters, accompanied by Conway on acoustic guitar. A sassy redheaded all-American wartime tragicomedienne, Pearle proceeds to lead us through a rousing, enlightening experience of connection and redemption as she takes us through each of the four pillars of Chautauqua (the words stencilled on the walls of the tent). Acknowledging that things are rough out there in the world, but having faith in “people power” and joining together, Pearle is no clueless Pollyanna. She gives it to us frank and candid, in a gentle, respectful interactive space—and always with the hope and belief that people can change the world.

A hilarious and poignant storyteller and rabble-rouser—true to his drag alter ego Pearle—Miller engages and entertains; touching on universal truths in an intimate, focused yet relaxed way that invites us all to be present, grounded and breathing throughout. The vintage props, puppetry and Creamsicle sing-song reminiscences are more than mere exercises in nostalgia or fond souvenirs of simpler times; they’re a meditation of sorts. A reminder to go back once in a while, to remember who you really are—that individual spirit you may have lost along the way in this hi-tech, fast-paced, ever changing workaday world. And that one flickering light bulb highlights that, no matter how hard you try to make things perfect, we live in an imperfect world—and we’re all imperfect or broken in some way. We’ve all done things that were less than kind, that we may regret. And while that admission can be infuriating, embarrassing and guilt-inducing, we can be better and we can let go.

When was the last time you sang or heard “One Tin Soldier”? The last time you had a Creamsicle? What takes you back to who you were all those years ago?

Part revival, part enlightening cabaret, Pearle Harbour’s Chautauqua invites us in and embraces us—valuing the spectrum of humanity and shining a light on that which unites us. It’s just the thing we need right now. Come on in and join Pearle in the tent.

Pearle Harbour’s Chautauqua continues in the TPM Mainspace until October 27; please note the 7:30 p.m. curtain time for evening performances. Should you book in advance to avoid disappointment? You betcha! Get advance tickets online or by calling the box office at: 416-504-7529.

The run includes a post-show Q&A, usually hosted by Jivesh Parasram, with cast and crew on October 14; and a pre-show chat, hosted by AD Andy McKim, with a cast member or local expert at 6:45 p.m. on October 17.

In the meantime, take a gander at the trailer:

 

 

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SummerWorks: Hilarious, haunting & high-brow good times in An Evening in July

Briana Templeton & Gwynne Phillips in An Evening in July
Briana Templeton & Gwynne Phillips in An Evening in July

I first saw the Templeton Philharmonic earlier this year in their Toronto Fringe Next Stage Festival production of Unbridled and Unstable. Whip smart and funny, with a talent for vintage characterizations and dialect – it was love at first sight.

The darlings of the Templeton Philharmonic are back, this time with their SummerWorks production of An Evening in July, currently running at St. George the Martyr Anglican Church (197 John St.). I saw the show yesterday – on an afternoon in August.

Inspired by the famous Grey Gardens documentary and Helene de Rothschild’s Surrealist Ball (1972), An Evening in July is a site-specific, immersive theatrical experience, during which the audience is invited to wander the garden courtyard and inside the estate home’s great room (the church hall, transformed), where one may purchase a drink from the cash bar before the show starts. The courtyard is rife with strange and beautiful objets – and we are invited to examine, and even touch, them. We are, however, forbidden to touch the ancient tower with the blue door at the end of the garden. The great room has been set up with banquet tables, covered with cast aside books, including a guest book. On the wall, there’s an old damaged painting of a man that looks as if someone’s put a fist to him.

Sisters May (Briana Templeton) and June (Gwynne Phillips) are a pair of exceedingly privileged and bored socialites, kicking around their crumbling and isolated family estate, with only their man servant Robert (Thom Stoneman) to look after them. Suddenly, an idea! Throw a birthday party for June! And everyone’s invited. Not entirely certain of when that is, they randomly choose an evening in July – like so many other random choices and decisions.

We follow the sisters back and forth between the garden and the house as they plan the party and reminisce about times past, incorporating audience members into their descriptions of various friends and acquaintances. We watch them play a hilarious game of badminton, and once the party is in full swing, are invited to join in a game of cards, and a game of cat and mouse beneath a pink parachute held aloft by all and sundry. Yes – I said pink!

Stellar, hysterically funny and heart-achingly touching performances. As June, Phillips is flippant and bored, and on some new bizarre diet every week – but lonely and wistful, longing for the return of happier times. Templeton’s May is Kate Hepburnesque, with a haughty, critical air and wry wit; there is also a sense of deep melancholy beneath the rich girl good times. Even through their sniping and grumbling, these two sisters love each other a whole bunch. And Stoneman is lovely as the affable and helpful Robert, acting as the sisters’ caretaker and bartender, and the audience’s host and guide.

It’s hilarious, haunting and high-brow good times, where the wit is dry and the bar is wet in An Evening in July.

An Evening in July continues at St. George the Martyr until Aug 16 – see the show page for exact dates/times. Those with mobility issues may secure a permanent seat for the duration of the festivities from the extremely nice Robert.

#TBT – My fabulous, fun period drag photo shoot with Lisa MacIntosh

I posted this during my pre-Facebook days, so thought some of you would get a kick out of seeing this – or seeing it again if you caught it the first time around. Here’s my post on my fabulous, big fun period drag photo shoot with Lisa MacIntosh (inspired by an acting gig I did at Alumnae Theatre several years ago):

Had so much fun on Saturday, spending the early afternoon with photographer Lisa MacIntosh and makeup artist Rebecca Kupferstein up in the Studio at Alumnae Theatre for my white tie and tails vintage photo shoot.

Inspired by Lisa’s shoot with actress Kate Drummond, who sported a fab vintage look, as well as my experience playing Cecil Graham in Alumnae’s production of Oscar Wilde’s Lady Windermere’s Fan several years ago, I decided to go with a period look as a male impersonator, in white tie and tails. For the makeup, we were inspired by Julie Andrews as Victor in Victor/Victoria.

Here are some select pics from the shoot. Thanks so much to Lisa and Rebecca for their beautiful work!

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Photo shoot with Lisa MacIntosh

Had so much fun on Saturday, spending the early afternoon with photographer Lisa MacIntosh and makeup artist Rebecca Kupferstein up in the Studio at Alumnae Theatre for my white tie and tails vintage photo shoot.

Inspired by Lisa’s shoot with actress Kate Drummond, who sported a fab vintage look, as well as my experience playing Cecil Graham in Alumnae’s production of Oscar Wilde’s Lady Windermere’s Fan several years ago, I decided to go with a period look as a male impersonator, in white tie and tails. For the makeup, we were inspired by Julie Andrews as Victor in Victor/Victoria.

Here are some select pics from the shoot. Thanks so much to Lisa and Rebecca for their beautiful work!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.