Identity, community & calling shenanigans on BS in the raw, real, nostalgic Situational Anarchy

 Graham Isador in Situational Anarchy

 

Pressgang Theatre joins forces with Pandemic Theatre to present Graham Isador’s one-man work of creative non-fiction Situational Anarchy, direction/dramaturgy by Tom Arthur Davis and Jivesh Parasram, and opening last night at Stop Drop N Roll.

Autobiographical, with an altered timeline and an amalgamation of several bands that were seminal in Isador’s life, Situational Anarchy is part self-discovery, part confession, and part ‘fuck you’ to betrayal and bullshit.

From the thoughtful, curious 11-year-old whose mind is blown when his mum gets real about his grade 6 music performance, to the awkward, large and bullied kid stumbling onto puberty, Graham is searching for meaning and desperate to belong. Try as he may, he can’t seem to find his place and almost checks out—then he discovers the punk band Against Me and its lead singer Laura Jane Grace, who later transitioned from male to female. Beyond the music, the social activism and humanity of this world resonate strongly.

His joy at discovering the music and the message increases when he finds community in the band’s online chatroom—and the cool, fun, smart Mouse, who lives in LA and steals his heart. Things fall apart when he gets caught up in Mouse’s unhealthy body image lifestyle and Against Me signs with Warner Music—which he views as a sell-out, as Warner also owns CNN—and he loses that online community and Mouse. Things come to a violent head when he drops by a local punk bar. It’s definitely not the community he knows and loves. Drafting a letter to Laura Jane Grace throughout, his correspondence serves as a framework for his story. And he’s calling bullshit on her. Years later, he takes a job interviewing her. So much to say.

Staged with multiple microphones, Situational Anarchy is a punk rock solo theatre piece. Isador’s performance is genuine, raw and personal, revealing a dark, edgy sense of humour and a profound longing to connect and belong. Weaving stories of coming of age, body image, homophobia, music and activism, he opens and closes his heart and mind to us in a funny and heart-breaking, at times violent, misfit’s journey of storytelling—reminding us of the power of music and message to inspire and unite.

With shouts to the design/running team: Ron Kelly (sound), Laura Warren (lighting/projection) and Heather Bellingham (stage manager).

Identity, community and calling shenanigans on bullshit in the raw, real, nostalgic Situational Anarchy.

Situational Anarchy continues at Stop Drop N Roll (300 College St., Toronto—above Rancho Relaxo) until June 3. Tickets at the door are Pay What You Want; advance tickets available online for $15. Heads-up: Seating very limited; only 25 seats per night.

All proceeds from the show (after expenses) will be donated to Trans Lifeline [US: (877) 565-8860 Canada: (877) 330-6366] and Gender is Over.

The closing performance will be followed by a set from Stuck Out Here.

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Toronto Fringe: Puberty in all its awkward, tragic & baffling glory – Morro and Jasp do Puberty

Morro and Jasp do Puberty - photo by Alex Nirta
Morro and Jasp do Puberty – photo by Alex Nirta

Getting your first period. Shaving your legs. Hair removal cream/bleach. Growing boobs. Boys. School dances. Kissing. Feeling funny “down there.”

All the female pubescent highlights are shouted out in Up your Nose and In your Toes (U.N.I.T.) Productions’ Morro and Jasp do Puberty, by Heather Marie Annis, Amy Lee and director Byron Laviolette, which opened to a packed house on the Tarragon Theatre mainspace on the first day of the Toronto Fringe Festival last night.

Clown sisters Morro (Annis) and Jasp (Lee) are tweens locked in the throes of puberty and all its accompanying changes, but couldn’t be more different. Morro is a rough and tumble, soccer baseball champ and badass tomboy who wants nothing to do with boys. Jasp is more cerebral, refined and girly, a diary-keeping daydreamer who longs for a date to the dance. And when it comes to the first onset of “that time of the month,” that “visit from Aunt Flo,” Morro is mortified and perplexed when she sees red while sitting on the toilet. Jasp has been anxiously, and happily, awaiting this rite of passage into womanhood since infancy.

It’s puberty for girls in all its awkward, tragic, baffling (and gross) glory – with all the feels. Brilliant, charming and poignant performances from Annis and Lee, accompanied by some big, bright, colourful costume and set design, and a bang-on soundtrack.

Morro and Jasp do Puberty pees your pants and warms your cockles. And you’ll never look at a tampon the same way again. I can’t wait till these guys do menopause.

Morro and Jasp do Puberty continues on the Tarragon mainspace until July 11 – see their Fringe page for exact dates/times. Advance booking strongly recommended.

After this, they’re taking the show to Edinburgh Fringe and have launched a crowdfunding campaign in support of their trip. Please consider donating to their Indiegogo campaign, open till July 15. You can also keep up with the Morro and Jasp shenanigans on Twitter.