Toronto Fringe: Bitterness, revenge & romance in four delicious courses in Kitchen Sink Drama

Mladen Obradović and Kelly Marie McKenna in Savour, the entrée play in Kitchen Sink Drama. Photo by Nina Kaye.

 

Kitchen Sink Productions, Plan A Theatre and Unspoken Theatre invite us into the kitchen for a four-course theatrical meal of bitterness, revenge and romance in their Toronto Fringe co-production of Kitchen Sink Drama; running in the Community Kitchen at the Ralph Thornton Centre.

Our cheeky, charming Waiter (Evan Boutsov) introduces us to each phase of this theatrical meal, ushering us through each course with archly comic entr’acte scenes; written by Sandra Cardinal and directed by Natalie Kaye.

The appetizer: Siren, written and directed by Natalie Kaye. Part origin story, part romance, part adventure on the high seas, a scullery maid’s (Maggie Cheung) life changes dramatically—from one of drudgery and abuse to one of rage and vengeance. Poetic, sensual and intense.

The salad course: Bitter Hearts, by Laurence Braun-Woodbury, directed by Nina Kaye. A heartbroken man (Naseem Reesha) grieves his lost love, rages against betrayal and eschews his former vegan diet as he revenge cooks a meat-based menu with his ex in mind. Tormented and drinking throughout, he begins to question his own sanity. Raw, gut-wrenching and poignant, we move through the emotional impact of this course with our chef.

The main course: Savour, by Aaliya Alibhai, directed by Sandra Cardinal. In an attempt to maintain contact with friends (mostly her ex-husband’s) following the end of her marriage, the restless and adrift Elizabeth (Andrea Irwin) hosts a dinner party at her home. Unbeknownst to her, her catering staff comprises a woodland fairy chef (Mladen Obradović) and a Selkie assistant (Kelly Marie McKenna). The fairies aren’t just there to cook and serve the food—and the evening takes an unexpected turn. Touching, funny and tender; a reminder that love can show up in unexpected places.

Dessert: A Trifle, by Nina Kaye, directed by Collette Radau. Lovers Peach and Plum (Jess Wareing and Maggie Cook) are at a B&B for a romantic get-away weekend and come down to the kitchen for a midnight snack. As they concoct a sweet treat, they begin to deconstruct their relationship; and jealous suspicions and confessions emerge. Adorably playful, sweet and honest; just because something falls down doesn’t mean it can’t be fixed.

And, in case you were wondering (no judgement here, I was wondering the same thing)—yes, there will be snacks!

Kitchen Sink Drama continues at the Ralph Thornton Centre (signs will direct you to the Community Kitchen on the 2nd floor) every night except tonight (July 8) at 7:30 p.m. until July 14. This is an extremely intimate venue—and last night’s performance was sold out—so advance booking is strongly advised.

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A charming, joyful celebration of life & love in Sabrina Fair

sabrina fair
Linus (Chris Coculuzzi), Sabrina (Amy LeBlanc) and David (Adam Brooks) are reunited in Sabrina Fair – photo by Dave Fitzpatrick

Amicus Productions gave the audience a magical evening of storytelling at Todmorden Mills Papermill Theatre last night with their production of Samuel Taylor’s Sabrina Fair, directed by Victoria Shepherd.

From its first moments, where ensemble actors Diana Franz and Meara Khanna open with a once-upon-a-time prologue, to the final discovery and acknowledgement of true feelings, Sabrina Fair is an engaging – and socially astute – piece of theatre. Not a mere 20th century rom com, Taylor’s play – and Amicus’s interpretation – is a combination of silly and sublime, as the story explores class and gender, and being true to oneself in the shifting social landscape of the early 1950s.

Shepherd has assembled a delightful cast for this theatrical adventure, with several stand-outs. Amy LeBlanc is a shimmering bundle of energy and wonder as Sabrina, a romantic realist, inspired by poetry and the excitement of the new and undiscovered – totally in love with the world even as she struggles to find her place in it. Chris Coculuzzi’s Linus is nicely layered; a man of panache and wit with killer business instincts – the tin man puppet master who’s forced to find his heart. Peter Bloch-Hansen is a treat as Mr. Larrabee, the somewhat befuddled family patriarch, whose bizarre hobby of attending funerals serves as a touchstone of certainty in a world he no longer understands. As his wife Maude, Sandra Cardinal is more self-aware than at first glance, with her sharp-witted – if not put upon – observations of society and family. And Heather Goodall, as Maude’s long-time chum Julia, hits just the right notes as the stylish, professional socialite, her self-possessed, well put-together exterior masking the vulnerability and loneliness beneath the surface. Nice work from Adam Brooks as Linus’s impetuous, boyish younger brother David; and Jeff Burke does a lovely job as Fairchild, Sabrina’s father and the family chauffeur, an extremely well-read man who’s full of surprises himself. All supported by a fine group of ensemble players.

With shouts to Alexis Chubb’s light, minimalist set design: the Larrabee’s garden patio, which is especially beautiful during the evening party scene, with its suspended multi-coloured lanterns and votive candles. And to Meredith Hubbard’s stunning costume design, which brings the palette and silhouette of this period – and this world – to life, especially with Sabrina’s and Julia’s frocks.

Amicus Productions’ Sabrina Fair is a charming, joyful celebration of life and love in a changing world.

Sabrina Fair continues its run at the Papermill Theatre until February 7, with matinée performances on February 1 and 7 at 2 p.m. Tickets are $22 regular and $20 seniors/students – available online or by phone at 416-860-6176.

Get yourself out for a wonderful time at the theatre. And, in case you were wondering – yes, this is the play that inspired the film Sabrina and the 1995 remake. In the meantime, check out the Amicus trailer:

And take a look at the interview with Amy LeBlanc.

Department of Corrections: Due to a last-minute casting change, one of the two prologue actors was incorrectly identified as Amaka Umeh and should have been noted as Diana Franz; this has been corrected.