Love shots & family in the entertaining, quixotic, poignant Quiver

quiver
Anna Chatterton in Quiver – photo by John Lauener

Nightwood Theatre opened its 2016-17 season at Buddies in Bad Times Theatre last week, with a unique double bill of Quote Unquote Collective’s Mouthpiece and Anna Chatterton’s Quiver. I saw both shows last night, starting with Quiver.

Written and performed by Anna Chatterton, and directed by Andrea Donaldson, Quiver incorporates a vocal processor, laptop and microphone, as well as a mini-sound and lighting board, to create atmospheric and vocal effects in this remarkable one-person show. As we enter the theatre, Chatterton is already onstage, DJ-like as she greets the audience and records pre-show announcement loops: recognizing that we are on Indigenous land, and cautioning against the taking of photos, etc. and cellphone use. There’s even a loop giving us the 411 on the fact that Chatterton is running all the lighting and sound cues. And that’s in addition to playing all the characters in this complex tale of love, family and archery super heroism.

We’re first introduced to 14-year-old Maddie, who lives with her divorced mom and 16-year-old sister Bea in an apartment so small that Maddie’s bedroom is the living/dining room. The primary storyteller in Quiver, Maddie shares her sharp observations of the world around her, particularly her mother’s bad romance with boyfriend Daniel, who turns out to be cheating on her with Bea; a revelation that turns their world upside down and leaves Maddie largely fending for herself as she navigates her own challenges at school and her first serious crush. In her solitude, she turns to her father’s abandoned archery equipment and the adventures of Arrowette, a kick-ass archer/superhero.

Quiver has a radio play vibe to it; and is a remarkable performance in its one-woman cast of characters. Funny, dramatic and quirky, Chatterton brings sharp, well-drawn characterizations – from the precocious, day-dreamy Maddie, to the 16 going on 25 Bea, to their wry-witted, laissez faire mom, and various friends and schoolmates. Turning on a dime as she changes character and manipulates her voice, it’s an impressive and engaging piece of solo storytelling.

Love shots and family in the entertaining, quixotic, poignant Quiver.

Quiver continues at Buddies until November 6. You can see it in the double bill with Mouthpiece or on its own. Tickets are sold separately; you can book in advance online or by phone.

In the meantime, check out an interview with Chatterton about Quiver. You can keep up with Nightwood Theatre on Twitter and Facebook.

And here’s the Quiver trailer:

 

 

 

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Author: life with more cowbell

Arts/culture social bloggerfly & Elwood P. Dowd disciple. Likes playing with words. A lot. Toronto

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