Trippy, quirky, thought-provoking mind-f*ck of a good time in The Summoned

The Summoned, Tarragon Theatre
Fabrizio Filippo in The Summoned – photos by Cylla von Tiedemann

If it can be done it will be done.

Static for a time, then appearing as if being typed by an unseen hand, there is a quasi-religious elegance to these words. God meets science.

This is how the stage is set for Tarragon Theatre’s world premiere of Fabrizio Filippo’s The Summoned, directed by Richard Rose, assisted by Joel Bernbaum – currently running in the Mainspace.

Tech giant Khan (one name, like Cher, chosen himself) is dead and his executor has called an assembly of the important figures in his life for the reading of his will at a shitty airport hotel in Toronto, run by his former partner/ex Annie (Maggie Huculak) and her son Aldous (Fabrizio Filippo). The hotel was set up as a safe house for the world’s intellectual elite, and the guests are transported to the location with impressive precision and secrecy by Khan’s security chief Quentin (Tony Nappo). Company president Gary (John Bourgeois) and lawyer Laura (Kelli Fox), and flight attendant and Aldous’s sort of girlfriend Isla (Rachel Cairns) round out the guest list. Instructions are relayed to Quentin via Walkie Talkie (Alon Nashman).

Aldous also serves as our narrator, setting the scenes and introducing the players, and we learn about Khan via flashback scenes, where we see how a young Khan (Filippo) meets a young Annie (Cairns), and get glimpses into their work together and the genesis of his empire. It appears obvious to everyone except Aldous that Khan is his father. And, of course, the reading of the will is largely Khan’s way of messing with his dearly beloved from beyond the grave. And it all gets emotional and weird. Really weird.

The Summoned, Tarragon Theatre
Kelli Fox, Rachel Carins, John Bourgeois, Maggie Huculak, Tony Napppo & Fabrizio Filippo in The Summoned

I effing love this cast. This is a wild, entertaining, high-energy ride – and this ensemble isn’t afraid to give ‘er. Playwright Filippo is a multitasking machine onstage, playing two very different characters. As Aldous, he brings an unflappable, almost eerie, sense of detachment and calm; minimally communicative and eschewing physical contact, there’s an Asperger’s quality to his relationship with the world. As Khan, he’s an impish, big personality; a mercurial and diabolically brilliant tech maestro with a lascivious appetite and flexible morals, he takes and uses what he wants, when and how he wants.

Huculak brings a lovely, layered sense of desperation and control to Annie; a brilliant, groundbreaking tech mind in her own right, her life forever changed by motherhood. Long estranged from Khan, she got the kid and he got the company, and she’s kept one foot in their once shared world by running the hotel safe house, perpetually longing for a connection with her son. Cairns is a kooky delight as Isla, the flight attendant who lives a seemingly charmed life; always living in the present, she is super spontaneous, hilariously irreverent and refreshingly honest. Nappo is a loveable combination of efficiency and wackiness as the cellphone snapping, air freshener spraying security guy Quentin; a schlub in a uniform, he also appears to be a narcoleptic, but this doesn’t stop him from executing his duties with tight-lipped, covert expertise. Bourgeois’ Gary is a great combo of funny and intimidating; an imposing corporate badass, Gary is entitled and cynical, and we see his soft underbelly emerge during the reading of the will. And Fox’s Laura is a gorgeous, ballsy 21st century Rosemary Clooney; pragmatic, but warm, she’s a sharp no-nonsense professional – and a woman with a confession to make.

The Summoned, Tarragon Theatre
Seated: John Bourgeois, Fabrizio Filippo & Maggie Huculak, with Kelli Fox on the floor

On the serious side, The Summoned is an exploration of the history and evolution of tech, and its applications and implications for our lives. If it can be done it will be done. Forever and ever, Amen.

With shouts to the design team, especially Jason Hand (lighting and set) and Kurt Firla (video) for the minimalist, multimedia environment; the playing space has a crisp, sleek quality to it – making you expect to see Steve Jobs walk out to launch a new iPhone. (Yes, I know, he’s dead.)

A trippy, quirky, thought-provoking mind-f*ck of a good time in The Summoned.

The Summoned continues in the Tarragon Mainspace until May 29; get your tix in advance, kids – this show is packing the house.

In the meantime, check out this Theatromania interview with playwright/actor Filippo.

Touching, disturbing macabredy – Murderers Confess at Christmastime

Three beds, suggesting three separate playing areas. And Christmas music, which is kinda trippy when you’re hearing it in August. Setting the scene for Outside the March/The Serial Collective co- production of Jason Chinn’s Murderers Confess at Christmastime, directed for SumerWorks by Simon Bloom.

An injured young actress (Amy Keating), home alone, becomes an unwitting host to a handsome, but uninvited guest (Harry Judge). A closeted young mayoral candidate’s (Aaron Willis) hook-up with a twink trick (Jeff Ho) he met online becomes woven into his life and relationship with his troubled former model wife (Candace Berlinguette). The relationship between a wheel-chair bound man (Tony Nappo) and a female co-worker (Nancy McAlear) becomes the catalyst for a future encounter.

The compelling storytelling includes a stellar cast, each executing his/her multi-layered character’s evolution with skill and respect throughout the piece. Keating is energetic and adorably quirky, yet surprisingly strong, as the young actress; and Judge gives a lovely, layered performance as a man living a secret life outside that of his family. Willis does a nice job of playing the duality of his character’s life – self-assured in the political arena, while his personal life is an exciting exploration in a minefield of secrets. Ho’s twink is a hip, cocksure boy, his flip sense of humour the other side of a loyal soul filled with empathy. Berlinguette brings a lovely combination of vulnerability and savvy to the damaged trophy wife, troubled and struggling to soldier on. Nappo gives us a sweet and accommodating, yet deeply lonely and frustrated, man longing for love and affection – something of a polar opposite to McAlear’s larger than life, hard-drinking, hilariously funny, yet equally lonely, co-worker.  No one is as he or she seems at first– and in every case, circumstance becomes the catalyst for action of a “didn’t know he/she had it in them” quality.

The one thing all three scenarios have in common is each character is filled with a deep longing to connect in some way, to fill a profound sense of loneliness and isolation. It’s ironic that, in this day and age when we have all this technology to help us connect with each other – the web, cellphones, Skype all feature in this play – we seem to be a more lonely race than ever.

Murderers Confess at Christmastime is a touching, disturbing macabredy – darkly funny and tension-filled, with moments of brutality and unexpected tenderness. It continues its SummerWorks run at the Lower Ossington Theatre main space until August 17. Go see this.