Toronto Fringe: Love vs. consent in the candid, intimate, autobiographical The Girl in the Photograph

Andrea Cabeza & David Chinchilla. Photo by Liliana Vera.

 

She signed her love notes with “The Girl in the Photograph”. He signed his with “Prince Charming”. She was 14 when their love affair began.

Chameleon Productions presents the true story of love behind the scenes at a young theatre company in Mexico with their Toronto Fringe production of The Girl in the Photograph. Created by Andrea Cabeza, written by Joel Pettigrew, and directed by Victoria Urquhart with associate director Melissa Fearon, the play is currently running in the Factory Theatre Studio.

This story of rule-breaking love begins in a police station interview room, where 15-year-old Paula (Andrea Cabeza) has been left stewing for hours; she is finally joined by Ofelia (Erin Roche), who is there to take her statement. Shifting back in time, we witness Paula’s story unfold. A gifted emerging young actor, Paula comes to work with 26-year-old Beto’s (David Chinchilla) theatre company, whose primary source of funding is the wealthy father of Beto’s live-in girlfriend Martina (Roche). Working hard and honing her craft, Paula shares with Beto a passion for Shakespeare and storytelling—and their actor student/director mentor relationship evolves into a secret passion for each other. Observing from the sidelines is Beto’s SM/assistant Alexia (Tamara Almeida), who is well-aware of Beto’s reputation with women, especially lovely and talented young actresses.

Conflicted and fearing for Paula’s safety, Alexia’s detached observation borders on complicity when she offers to drive Paula to Beto’s home for their secret romantic meetings. Conflicted herself, Paula struggles with Beto’s endless excuses for delaying his break-up with Martina—and Martina’s pregnancy adds an additional complication. Paula knows she should leave him, but can’t bring herself to do it. And when the relationship is revealed to Paula’s mother, their world is blown apart.

Beautifully nuanced, honest and respectful performances from the cast in this candid, intimate autobiographical piece. Like the love vs. consent scenario we saw onstage last fall with Rose Napoli’s Lo (or Dear Mr. Wells)—which portrayed a student/teacher relationship, told from the point of view of the student—The Girl in the Photograph forces us to question our position. Is a minor, no matter how wise beyond her years she may be, truly able to consent to a sexual relationship with an adult? Where does the onus lie in such a situation? In the end, Paula is left to work through the impact—both positive and negative—on her personal and professional life, and find closure as she chooses the path her life takes next.

With shouts to the design and music teams: Original music by Marina Lopez, performed live on acoustic guitar by Owen Gardner, sound design by Johnny Salib, and production design by Ruth Albertyn.

The Girl in the Photograph continues in the Factory Theatre Studio until July 15; check the show page for exact dates/times.

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The meaning of life, death & the role of a lifetime in the moving, tender & funny Or Not To Be

Andrew Robinson, Shawn DeSouza-Coelho & Karen Scobie in Or Not To Be—photo by Vic Finucci

 

I was back at Red Sandcastle Theatre last night, this time for Glass Hammer Productions’ presentation of Andrew Batten’s Or Not To Be, directed by Julia Haist. I saw the premiere at Alumnae Theatre’s New Ideas Festival last year and was excited to see the evolution of the piece.

Actor Ben (Shawn DeSouza-Coelho) and director Sebastian (Andrew Robinson), also best friends, are working on putting together a production of Hamlet, with Ben playing the tragic hero. It’s the production of a lifetime—and the role of a lifetime for Ben—in more ways than one. Ben is living with a rare cancer, and his life now revolves around post-op treatments, medical appointments and an uncertain future. Rounding out his support team are his family and partner Sarah (Karen Scobie)—all touched in his or her own way by Ben’s illness.

Beneath the brave face Ben puts on for the world is a deep-seated internal conflict about the project and his treatment. As he struggles with side effects, low energy, frustration, and the fear of forgetting his lines and sucking at the role, he begins to wonder who he’s doing all of this for—and he’s faced with some hard choices, the impact of which will ripple out to those he loves.

Really lovely work and great chemistry from this three-hander cast in this intimate and candid production. DeSouza-Coelho’s Ben is a compelling picture of stoicism and determination, his thousand-mile stare and stillness belying the troubled soul beneath the surface; and he gives us nicely drawn Hamlet in a selection of classic soliloquies. Robinson brings the perfect balance of cockiness and warmth to Sebastian; Ben’s best friend since grade school, his theatrical ambitions are put into perspective by his support and care of Ben. Scobie gives Sarah a poignant sense of vulnerability and conflict as Ben’s lovingly supportive and uncomplaining partner; torn between wanting what’s best for Ben and not wanting to let him go, Sarah must confront her own feelings and motives. These relationship dynamics have all the truth, humour and feeling of people who know each other well—and in Ben and Sebastian’s case, a long time. And while the truth may be hard to take, it’s served up with love and honesty.

In the end, it makes you think. How would you react in Ben’s situation? What would your life be? And, as your life is right now, what’s your Hamlet? We are reminded that time is a precious, non-renewable resource—and despite the best intentions of those we love, it is we who must ultimately decide what path our lives will take.

With shouts to Liz Currie, the intrepid stage manager, lighting designer and tech in the booth; and to Wellspring, an organization—noted in the program—that provides programs and services for people living with cancer and their caregivers.

The meaning of life, death and the role of a lifetime in the moving, tender and funny Or Not To Be.

Or Not To Be continues at Red Sandcastle until January 28, Thursday through Saturday at 8 pm, with 2 pm matinees on Jan 20, 21, 27 and 28. Tickets available by calling the box office at 416 845-9411, or online at this link for first seven shows and this link for the final seven shows.