A gothic fairy tale of spiritual connections, mystical protectors & escaping a monster in Brenda Clews’ gripping, magical Fugue in Green

Like a bullet in slow motion, she floated over treetops for as long as it took to blink.

A gothic fairy tale of spiritual connections, mystical protectors and escaping the clutches of a monster, this is the opening line of Brenda Clews’ mesmerizing, magical novella Fugue in Green, published by Quattro Books.

Teen siblings Steig and Curtis struggle to survive live with their cruel, controlling and abusive mother Leica while their filmmaker father Reb is away working in England. Their monster mother is a catalyst for Steig’s escapes into the woods that surround their Vermont home, where Steig finds solace in nature. It is in these moments that we learn that Steig is a magical, elemental young woman who becomes the landscape she loves and shelters in. She also sees ghosts: her grandparents and a former teacher. And the ghosts tell her things. And she has a spritely sentinel: a bird man called forth from her connection to the woods to be her guardian.

Reb lives and works with his dreams—and dreams while awake—the everyday becoming surreal, expressionist visions that surround him; a visual poet, he creates poetry with images instead of words. And what of the mysterious and angelic Clare, a magician with a camera who arrives in his life at the precise moment he needs her—both personally and professionally?

Steig’s younger brother Curtis busies himself with more traditional, earth-bound teen pursuits. While not fully immune to their mother’s unreasonable expectations, unpredictable behaviour and wrath, he bears the least of it. And when their mother goes too far with Steig one day, Curtis launches a plan to flee their mother, contact their father and join him in England. Their journey to safety is fraught with terrifying memories and shared visions, but is also protected by forest spirits.

Secrets are revealed—with devastating results. Reb had no idea about the child abuse going on in his own home; forced to move beyond his own sense of guilt of being so distant from his children, who he realizes he barely knows, he’s determined to make a safe, supportive home for them. He’s been away too much and for too long. Meanwhile, back at the family’s home in Vermont, and realizing that her children are gone, Leica flies into a spiralling, destructive rage that echoes across an ocean.

Supernatural, spiritual connections emerge and reveal themselves; the battle between order and wilderness embodied in the relationship between Steig’s mother and Steig—and even Reb. Love, family, myth and metaphysics intertwine, winding around these relationships as the two children escape the witch at home and into the arms of those who truly love them.

Magical, sensuous and seductive, Clews’ words swirl around you and draw you in; mesmerizing with evocative colours and haunting, ethereal—and sometimes disturbing—images. A short, gripping modern fairy tale, it’s perfect for curling up for an afternoon or evening read, easily finished in one sitting.

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Brenda Clews

Clews is also an artist and a poet; you can view her work on her website, and on YouTube and Vimeo. You can also connect with Clews on Twitter and Facebook.

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Former high school pals reunite to solve an old, gruesome mystery in the dark, macabre, thoughtful Swan

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Bria McLaughlin & Michelle Chiu in Swan – photos by Cesar Ghisilieri

Finish what you start.

Little Black Afro Theatre joins forces with Filament Incubator for a production of Aaron Jan’s Swan, directed by Jan and dramaturged by Lucy Powis; and opening last night to a packed house in the Theatre Passe Muraille (TPM) Backspace.

As we enter the theatre and settle into our seats, the playing space (Aram Heydarian, who designed the costumes), sound (Kevin Feliciano) and foggy, atmospheric lighting (Samuel Chang) aptly set the tone for this disturbing tale of violence. Three piles of feathers line the apron. Centre stage is a wooden deck-like structure – and above it, a murder of black birds hangs like a menacing Hitchcockian mobile. Underneath the hum of chatting audience members, you can hear the gentle sound of lapping water and birds.

Returning home to Hamilton after a 10-year absence, writer Joey (Bria McLaughlin) is on a mission. Ten years ago, the night of her high school prom, an injured swan was brutally killed and dismembered at Cootes Paradise (a wetland on the west side of Hamilton Harbour), and the perpetrator was never found. She and a group of friends had tried to solve the mystery back then, but came up empty and gave up.

Despite her older sister Bill’s (Michelle Chiu) skepticism, Joey gets the gang back together in an awkward sort of reunion. Once a tight group of lesbian friends, they formed an environmental group at their now decommissioned, abandonned school in an effort to affect positive change in their city: Rachel (Isabel Kanaan), Piper (Christine Nguyen) and Ron (Angela Sun). The fifth member of the group, Jenna Lynn (Marina Moreira) went missing the night of the prom. And the papers made a bigger deal about the swan.

A horrific trail of clues – photographs of their local hang-outs, each one accompanied by growing numbers of bird carcasses – leads them around the city as they hunt for the swan killer. As they grow weary of their fruitless efforts, suspicion arises. Is the killer among them? Loyalties come into question as memories of some ugly interactions emerge, including Jenna Lynn’s expulsion from the group. All is revealed in the disturbing ending, as mystery turns supernatural.

Excellent work from this cast of women in this spooky, quick-paced tale of otherness and search for the truth. As Joey, McLaughlin is a born leader; an inspiring, determined and cunning negotiator with a lot of smarts and a quick wit, Joey has struggled through her own life-changing injury and has made a modest name for herself as a writer. As Joey’s big sis Bill, Chiu brings a nice combination of cynicism and wariness; Bill thinks Joey and her friends are nuts for trying to solve this case, but she’s also concerned for her sister’s welfare and longs to build a brighter future for what’s left of their family.

Kanaan gives Rachel a great sense of inner conflict; once the class over-achiever, type-A Rachel is in a rut. Ten years after high school, she’s still working as a lifeguard at the local rec centre – and re-opening the case of the murdered swan has sparked her dulled ambition. Nguyen’s Piper is a quirky delight; a lanky athlete with a huge appetite. The peacemaker of the group, she just wants everyone to chill and get along.

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Angela Sun, Isabel Kanaan & Christine Nguyen in Swan

As Ron, Sun is the hasbien of the group, who went on to a traditional, “respectable” heterosexual marriage complete with kids and church activities. Sun gives her some deep tones, though; as we learn that Ron is good at keeping secrets and forgetting things, as well as putting up with some clueless everyday racism – dressed up as cultural interest – from her husband. Moreira’s Jenna Lynn is a lovely combination of bashful and forceful; coming late into the group, it’s Jenna Lynn who takes them in a more effective direction as they comb the community page of the Spec (the Hamilton Spectator) for local problems to solve.

All are outsiders by virtue of their ethnicity, colour and/or sexuality. An all are adrift in lives interupted; seeking identity, and a sense of belonging and purpose. Like the characters in Jan’s Rowing, there’s a feeling of being trapped in a city that doesn’t want them and has nothing for them – even as they struggle to make the best of it and make something of themselves. If they could just solve this mystery, things will turn around for them. And, like it’s sister play Tire Swing, Swan is a dark tale of memory, traumatic experience and mystery.

Former high school pals reunite to solve an old, gruesome mystery in the dark, macabre, thoughtful Swan.

Swan continues in the TPM Backspace till Nov 13; get your tix online or call 416-504-7529. Please note the 7:30 curtain time for evening performances.

Rootin’ tootin’, swashbuckling good time had by all at Sex T-Rex double feature Sex T-Rep

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Sex T-Rex opened its hilarious, action-packed Sex T-Rep at the Storefront Theatre to a full house last night, with a double feature line-up of Watch Out Wildkat! and Swordplay: A Play of Swords.

Sex T-Rex is: Conor Bradbury, Julian Frid, Kaitlin Morrow (co-producer), Seann Murray (co-producer) and Daniel Pagett; with director Alec Toller and stage manager Katherine Belyea.

Watch Out Wildkat! A classic tale of revenge in the wild west takes a supernatural turn as Wildkat (Morrow) sets out to kill the man that killed her Pa (Pagett). As she tracks the varmint down, she meets the Devil (Bradbury), who has a hold on her Pa. Forced to make a deal with the Devil to save her Pa’s soul, Wildkat becomes his hired gun as the two set off to hunt down Spider (Murray), who is threatening to usurp the Devil. And when you make a deal with the Devil… Add some hysterically inept prospectors (Bradbury, Frid, Murray and Pagett) and you got yerself some high noon, good, bad and ugly good ‘ole times.

The cast does an outstanding job with this cowboy adventure, with the whole gang playing multiple roles. As Wildkat, Morrow is a driven, ruthless and formidable fighter with both fists and gun, her singlemindedness is tempered only by her good heart and love for her Pa. Bradbury is hilariously devious as the shape-shifting, and oftentimes befuddled, Devil; a creature who loves the boozing and shenanigans, but not so happy to forced into some hard work in order to defeat his enemy. Murray is diabolical as Spider, a terrifying and cold presence, and unbeatable at the poker table; and he gives a great comedic turn as the toothless prospector Curly. Frid is a riot as the interrupting, poncho-wearing Lonesome Cowboy, the narrator of this tale; and Pagett is hysterical and the grinning, ineffectual star-hatted Sheriff.

Watch Out Wildkat! is a rootin’ tootin’, sharp shootin’ good time.

Swordplay: A Play of Swords. Video game meets The Princess Bride meets The Three Musketeers meets Game of Thrones meets every other swordy thing you’ve ever seen. When his beloved Princess Pimpernel (Morrow) is abducted by the evil Baron Thorne (Frid), fallen knight Barnabas (Bradbury) sets out to rescue her. With the assistance of brother in arms Salvatore (Murray), the two face great odds and, outnumbered, battle their way into the Baron’s stronghold. But the maiden in distress is not what she appears to be, and when the two knights come face to face with a former comrade, things really get bent. Sword fights, magic, vintage video game graphics and a dragon – and did I mention that it’s all framed in the present day, as Grandpa (Pagett) plays an old video game with his sick granddaughter (Morrow)?

Once again, the cast does an awesome job with the genre. As Barnabas, Bradbury is channeling Oliver Reed from The Three Musketeers; a haunted man struggling to carry on when he’s lost everything he held dear, but ultimately unwilling to give up the fight. Murray’s Salvatore is very Inigo Montoya, a passionate Spaniard and master swordsman, loyal to his friends and death to his enemies. Morrow’s Princess Pimpernel is a combination of Cersei and Daenerys; cunning and fierce, she is not as helpless as she appears. Frid is deliciously evil as the manipulative Baron Thorne and later – as an even more dangerous foe to our intrepid heroes, using magic and fire to confound and defeat all who stand in his path. And Pagett is hilarious as the warm-hearted, smart-ass Grandpa – taking a page from Peter Falk’s book – and the neglected, put-upon servant Igor, a man of low self-esteem who just needs a kind word now and again.

Swordplay: A Play of Swords is a swashbuckling, magical trip of camaraderie, good vs. evil an old-school gaming.

Both shows draw inspiration from pop culture, genre film and TV, and a child-like sense of fun – and the playful, imaginative storytelling, and use of props and cinematic staging adds to the laugh out loud good times.

But wait – there’s more! Popcorn, booze, awesome Sex T-Rex merch (including gatch) and super friendly folks. And the program includes fun and handy cowboy and swordplay quote generators!

A rootin’ tootin’, swashbuckling good time was had by all at Sex T-Rex double feature Sex T-Rep.

Sex T-Rep continues to March 27 at Storefront Theatre. It’s an intimate space and a very popular company, so advance booking is strongly recommended. Book tix online; both shows run every night, and you can book one show for $20 or both for $30.