Preview: The search for a healing prayer in Spiderbones Performing Arts’ mind-blowing, heart-wrenching Everything I Couldn’t Tell You

Searching for a healing prayer with science, music and ancestral language. Spiderbones Performing Arts combines the arts of neuroscience, and music and language therapy with traditional Indigenous healing principles in its moving, mind-blowing multi-media production of Jeff D’Hondt’s Everything I Couldn’t Tell You, directed by Erin Brandenburg and running in the Theatre Centre’s Incubator space as part of the RISER Project.

Cassandra’s (Jenny Young) neuroscience has brought Megan (PJ Prudat) out of a coma, but she fears the combination of electric current and music applied to the brain may have done more harm than good. Still struggling to remember what happened to her, every emotion Megan feels presents as anger; attempts at talk therapy and other standard treatments aren’t working and Megan’s responses, fuelled by alcohol and her hatred of Cassandra, are becoming increasingly violent. When Megan fires Cassandra and demands a therapist who speaks Lenape, Cassandra reluctantly brings the experimental, unorthodox Indigenous neuropsychologist Alison (Cheri Maracle) onboard.

Unlike Cassandra’s method of electric and music impulses input into the passive brain, Alison’s method incorporates active, directed output from Megan’s brain, and translates those choices into music. Even more importantly, Alison has learned that conducting sessions in Lenape calms Megan’s tortured brain—and she’s convinced that a combination of their therapies will uncover Megan’s healing prayer.

While their approaches differ, Cassandra and Alison are both haunted by the loss of someone they loved very much: Cassandra’s partner Melanie (Cheri Maracle) and Alison’s sister Steph. Torn between maintaining a professional perspective and distance, and sharing their personal experiences of pain and grief, they both struggle with the question: who are they doing this work for? And who are they really treating—and what does this mean for Megan’s recovery?

Strong, compelling and heartbreaking performances all around in this powerful three-hander. Young delivers a taut performance as Cassandra; distant and clinical, even cold, on the surface, Cassandra is tightly wound—holding onto self-control with all her might and she navigates the aftershocks of losing Melanie while continuing her work, and lashes out with her sharp scientific mind. Moments of beautiful artistry and tenderness are revealed in a flashback, where the shy introvert Cassandra meets Melanie at a conference. Maracle brings a remarkable sense of strength and conflict to the brilliant, haunted Alison; struggling with her own ghosts, as well as confidence in herself and her theories in the face of so much doubt and derision, memories of her sister both break her heart and push her to find a way to help Megan. Alison’s determined to connect—and persists through each barrier and set-back. Prudat’s Megan is part wild child, part lost girl; as her memories surface, she mourns the familial discouragement away from her heritage, her own Uma (grandmother) steering her towards piano lessons to get her away from the ‘evil’ drum. Her irreverent, devil-may-care feral outbursts are both a cover for and a symptom of her profound pain and suffering—and she’s got the guts to do whatever it takes to get better and get her life back, however dangerous it may be.

Shouts to the evocative work from the design team: Michel Charbonneau (set), Tess Girard (videographer), André du Toit (lighting), Isidra Cruz (costume) and Andrew Penner (sound/composition) for creating a world that combines the clinical with the natural in a striking, innovative way. White set, with images—brain scans, shimmering water and art therapy drawings—and English translations of the Lenape text projected on pieces of scrim that hang like hospital curtains. The scrim also creates ghost-like barriers for flashbacks featuring lost loved ones. And there’s an opportunity to hear the Lenape language in a visceral way, with bone conduction headphones that transmit the sound into your cheekbones, providing a physical experience of the language and leaving your ears free to hear it. Headsets are limited, and distributed via a combination of game of chance and lottery draw before each performance.

Science, music, art and language combine in the search of a healing prayer in Spiderbones Performing Arts’ mind-blowing, heart-wrenching Everything I Couldn’t Tell You.

Everything I Couldn’t Tell You continues in the Theatre Centre Incubator space until May 12. Tickets available by calling The Theatre Centre’s Box Office at 416-538-0988 or online; advance booking strongly recommended, as it’s an intimate space and a short run.

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An entertaining, poignant love letter to roots, family & father in Paolozzapedia

 

Paolozzapedia Adam & Mask_horizontal photo credit  Lacey Creighton
Adam Paolozza in Paolozzapedia – photo by Lacey Creighton

 

Why Not Theatre’s 2015 edition of the RISER Project continued the final leg of its programming last night at the Theatre Centre with the opening performances of Mahmoud (which I saw on Wed. night – see the post here) and Paolozzapedia.

Written and performed by Adam Paolozza, who co-directed with Daniele Bartolini, and produced in partnership with Bad New Days Performing Arts, Paolozzapedia is described as an “auto-fictional-biography” – a personal, one-man trip across time, space and cultures in the search for meaning.

Paolozzapedia uses a delightful combination of personal anecdote, traditional storytelling and documentary. The performance tool box includes monologue, dialogue, songs accompanied by acoustic guitar, projected images and text (including English subtitles) and commedia dell’arte performance as Paolozza flashes back and forth in time and location, highlighting the moments that resonate. A personal history tour, mined for what the past can say about the present.

Evocative staging and pacing capture the imagination and take us along on this trip, starting with an easy-going, slow groove as Paolozza makes Italian coffee onstage, sending pre-made pots of coffee around the audience. It’s like we’re all hanging out in his kitchen as he sets up the story. A story of how a disillusioned and depressed young man decides to take a journey into the past – to his father’s hometown in southern Italy. Despairing of the present and anxious about the future – ever aware of the fleeting nature of time – he seeks to find some grounding in the present and the ability to move forward into the future. As he travels by train from the airport to meet a family friend who will drive him the rest of the way to his father’s town, the projected image of the moving train window makes us feel like we’re on that train with him.

The storytelling is both moving and fun and; serious and silly. The heart wrenching scene of his father’s family leaving for Canada on a ship – his father a small boy at the time – held up by his father as they stand at the railing, waving goodbye to the loved ones they leave behind. Punchinello makes an appearance, cheeky, full of fun – scrapping with Death by poking fun at seriousness in general and Paolozza’s pensiveness in particular. Even with the recognition of impermanence, Paolozzapedia celebrates life in its acknowledgement of nostalgia, memories of events both big and small – and reminds us to appreciate and cherish the sweet moments as they come.

Paolozzapedia is an entertaining, poignant love letter to roots, family and father. Go sit with Adam, have a coffee.

Paolozzapedia continues its run at the Theatre Centre Incubator space until May 24.

Be sure to check out these last two RISER Project shows; you can get advance tix online here.

 

Charmingly funny, moving & thought-provoking insight on identity & culture in Mahmoud

Mahmoud_Poster_FINAL
Tara Grammy in Mahmoud – photo by Nir Bareket

Why Not Theatre’s 2015 edition of the RISER Project continued its programming last night at the Theatre Centre with previews of its two final shows – I saw Mahmoud.

Produced in partnership with Pandemic Theatre, written by Tara Grammy and Tom Arthur Davis, directed by Davis and starring Grammy, Mahmoud is a one-person whirlwind of storytelling – the highs, lows and in-betweens of three seemingly disparate characters that eventually cross paths.

Iranian electrical engineer turned Toronto taxi driver Mahmoud is a congenial host in his cab, keenly interested in people and always up for a conversation, especially when it comes to talking about his homeland. His love for home is palpable – he adores Persian culture and poetry, and misses the food. But it’s been 25 years since he’s been there, and the Iran he longs for no longer exists – and past events, the ones that brought him to Canada, continue to haunt him. Emanuelos is a fabulously flaming gay Spanish perfume salesman with a hot Iranian boyfriend, Behnam, who’s currently back home in Iran on a family matter. It’s a complicated relationship, as Behnam’s family is very traditional – and more conservative than Emanuelos wants to admit. And we see self-described Iranian-Canadian Tara go from an awkward, earnest tween aspiring actress to a driven young woman working to establish a career in the industry.

Identity, and cultural perceptions of women, sexuality and relationships play strongly in Mahmoud – each character is conflicted and layered in such a way that you can never tell the whole story from just looking on the surface. Assumptions and stereotypes are highlighted. Emanuelos’ feelings for Behnam, his own personal Prince of Persia, feed off the sexy and erotic draw of the exotic other. Tara wants to distinguish herself as an actor – and not as a doctor or some other white-collar profession that her parents would like her to be – but also just wants to blend in with her more western-looking peers. Her perceptions of outward beauty – blonde and hairless – are turned upside down when an agent wants to capitalize on her “exotic” natural look. And Mahmoud’s conservative views towards women and relationships may seem at odds with an educated man who has the heart of a poet, but his values ground him and help him to make sense of an otherwise senseless world.

Grammy is a delightful and engaging storyteller, shifting in and out of each character with style and clarity – and, above all, with truth and respect. No one is perfect – and that’s definitely the case with her three characters, which each have a delightful quirkiness of his or her own. And in each character’s individuality, she shows us the commonality – all want to be loved, work, belong and connect.

Mahmoud is a charmingly funny, moving and thought-provoking look at identity and culture.

Mahmoud continues its run at the Theatre Centre Incubator space until May 24. Check out the RISER Project and it’s exciting 2015 program. You can get advance tix online here.

 

 

 

Partnership & mentorship flourish in the second year of the RISER Project

Ravi Jain headshot (small)
Ravi Jain, Artistic Director of Why Not Theatre

“There are a great deal of opportunities within the Toronto theatre community for mentorship and the development of artists but The RISER Project is unique in that it creates a rare opportunity for companies and artists to be mentored through production … this model empowers artists to find their voice and not rely on curation or abstract training.” – Ravi Jain, Artistic Director at Why Not Theatre

In 2014, Why Not Theatre created an exciting new theatre production model, aimed at providing support to small companies, and provide greater access and opportunity for artists. In partnership with senior theatre companies, and the support of the Toronto Arts Council and Canadian Heritage, the RISER Project provides mentorship, space and technical tools – this year, culminating in the performances of four Canadian productions at the Theatre Centre in April and May. I had the opportunity to ask Why Not Theatre A.D. Ravi Jain about the RISER Project and the 2015 program:

LWMC: Hi, Ravi. Thanks for taking some time from what I’m sure is a very busy and exciting schedule to talk about the RISER Project. During the two years leading up to the creation of the RISER Project, Why Not Theatre had been exploring and searching for a model to support and mentor independent theatre productions. What can you tell us about the genesis of this particular (RISER Project) model?

RJ: The genesis of the model came out of my time as the Artistic Director in Residence at the Theatre Centre. It was a position that Franco Boni created at the theatre to allow me the experience of running an arts institution in Toronto. There we had many discussions about the Theatre Centre’s residency program, which offers 2-3 years of support for artists to develop a new show from the first moments of the idea all the way through to production. My feeling was that there were many opportunities for long-term development, but not many opportunities to put on work. As an artist, it is difficult to have people see your work, as opportunities are limited, so the question was: How can someone see my work, in order to get the reputation to be offered a long term residency? I am also a resident artist at Soulpepper, and one of the brilliant things that they do is run shows in rep. The rep system saves a great deal of money by using space very efficiently. So in our first year, we created a model where three companies shared a space for six weeks and ran their shows in rep… and then the Riser was born.

LWMC: And how did the 2015 partnerships with Necessary Angel, Nightwood Theatre, fu-GEN Theatre and The Theatre Centre emerge as the RISER Project came together?

RJ: In our first year, we partnered with Theatre Smith Gilmour, who played an important role in the development of the model. We brought them on board for two key reasons: mentorship and investment. Being a senior company, they have over 40 years of experience in creating and devising work – their expertise was ideal for the shows we were presenting at the time. Also, because of funding structures, senior companies receive the most amounts of operating funds at all the council levels. A main focus of the model is encouraging these senior companies with the funds to invest the money to companies with no structure or funds, thus creating an interdependent community (moving away from independent). So, for this year, we wanted to try and expand the partnerships and encourage other companies to get on board. The added bonus for the artists involved, and our hope is, that these senior companies may pick up the shows in order to give them future life in an upcoming season.

LWMC: The 2015 RISER Project production series includes four theatre companies, including three world premieres: Quote Unquote Collective’s Mouthpiece, The Little Death Collective’s Little Death, Pandemic Theatre’s Mahmoud and Bad New Days Performing Arts’ Paolozzapedia – An auto-fictional-biography. How did these companies/productions come to be a part of the RISER Project?

RJ: These companies were selected because of their needs and their ability to be flexible within the model we are creating. We are in our second year, so there are still kinks we are trying to sort out – so these are people who are able to help us figure out how this all works and more importantly, roll with the punches. In the future, next year, we will be putting out an open call in order to open up this opportunity to more artists.

LWMC: What do you hope the participating partners and theatre companies will take away from the 2015 RISER Project?

RJ: I want people to understand that we can be even bolder as a community and work in a more collaborative way. Resources are scarce and there are A LOT of inefficiencies in spending, so we have to be diligent and more critical of ourselves as to how we are spending that money. This model really is designed in such a way that everyone wins, and the winning happens because of strategic, smart investments. It’s a model that is seen in many other sectors and one with a proven track record. It’s about building a supportive community.

LWMC: And what about the audience?

RJ: They will see great shows. They will see great shows at an accessible price.

LWMC: Where does the RISER Project go from here? Do you envision an annual production event, several throughout the year …?

RJ: We will be doing another next year, fingers crossed, with six or seven companies/artists’ projects… stay tuned for our open call.

All RISER Project performances will take place at The Theatre Centre (1115 Queen St W) and will feature two performances in succession every night. The 2015 program includes four Canadian plays, with three premieres:

Mouthpiece - photo by Brooke Wedlock
Mouthpiece – photo by Brooke Wedlock

Mouthpiece (April 17 – May 3)
Company: Quote Unquote Collective
Created and performed by: Amy Nostbakken and Norah Sadava
Music composed by: Amy Nostbakken
A world premiere, Mouthpiece takes us on a one-day journey of a woman trying to find her voice – using a combination of “a cappella harmony, dissonance, text and a range of physicality including dance and physical storytelling.”

Little Death - actor Christopher Stanton, photo credit Emily Lockhart
Christopher Stanton in Little Death – photo by Emily Lockhart

Little Death (April 17 – May 3)
Company: The Little Death Collective
Written by: Daniel Karasik
Directed by: Zachary Florence
Performed by: Shauna Black, Sarah Dodd, Kate Hennig, Christopher Stanton, Nicole Underhay and Elizabeth Tanner
In another world premiere, a man who might be dying goes in search of sex and connection in hotel bars – this with the permission of his conflicted wife. Little Death “asks fundamental questions about marriage, fidelity, and the intimate needs of men and women.”

Mahmoud_Poster_FINAL
Mahmoud – photo by Nir Bareket

Mahmoud (May 14 – 24 with preview May 13)
Company: Pandemic Theatre
Co-written and performed by: Tara Grammy
Co-written and directed by: Tom Arthur Davis and Tara Grammy
The lives of an Iranian engineer turned taxi driver, a gay Spanish perfume salesman and an Iranian Canadian pre-teen converge in this one-woman show. “…Their experiences with racism, sexism, homophobia, political structures and everything in between become intertwined in unexpected ways, taking an exacting look at the ways diasporic populations deal with instability in their country of origin and the personhood they have in their new homes.”

Paolozzapedia Adam & Mask_horizontal photo credit  Lacey Creighton
Adam Paolozza in Paolozzapedia – photo by Lacey Creighton

Paolozzapedia – An auto-fictional-biography (May 14 – 24 with preview May 13)
Company: Bad New Days Performing Arts
Written and directed by: Adam Paolozza and Daniele Bartolini  Featuring: Adam Paolozza
A world premiere of a one-man autobiography experiment finds Paolozza mining his Italian family history to present his journey with storytelling, imagery, music and memories. “How is it that one feels homesick for a place that was never one’s home?”

Be sure to check out the RISER Project and it’s exciting 2015 program. You can get advance tix online here.

And check out the trailer for Mouthpiece: